cycloalkane


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cycloalkane

[¦sī·klō′al‚kān]
(organic chemistry)
References in periodicals archive ?
Fickinger of Penn State and her team have converted a mixture of petroleum and coal into a fuel that contains heat-resistant cycloalkanes.
F purposes of discussing their fates and effects, most can be conveniently divided into four categorie alkanes, cycloalkanes, olefins (or alkenes) and cycloalkenes, and aromatics.
Bhaumik, Mesoporous Cr-MCM-41: An Efficient Catalyst for Selective Oxidation of cycloalkanes, J.
In addition to paraffinic and olefinic, respectively characterized by alkanes' saturated and alkenes' unsaturated (at least one double bond between carbon atoms) straight or branched chains, there are the more relevant naphthenic, with mostly cycloalkanes (saturated methylene group rings -- picture adjacent tiles on a Scrabble board) and aromatic, in which unsaturated benzene rings characterize the molecular structure.
Topics include the analysis of alkanes and cycloalkanes, alkenes and alkynes, aromatic compounds, hydroxyl-containing compounds, water, amines and amides, carbonyls, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides and proteins, synthetic polymers and rubbers, and a history of NIR applications.
Products consisted of a mixture of phenyl and cycloalkyl methyl ethers, alkylbenzenes, branched paraffins and alkylated cycloalkanes.
In general, the biodegradation of oil components usually occurs in the following order: alkanes, branched alkanes, the aromatic compounds and finally cycloalkanes [e.
But that process still leaves a haystack of many compounds (such as branched alkanes, cycloalkanes, and aromatics) that cannot be identified.
The agents detected in both water and sediment included petrol effluents, including many poly-cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), benzene, toluene, and xylene, long-chain and branched hydrocarbons, phenols, alcohols, chlorinated alkylbenzenes, trichlorethylene, trichlorophenol, cresols, cycloalkanes, aldehydes, ketones, many brominated and chlorinated aromatic organic compounds, di-(2-ethyihexyl)phthalate, diphenyl, hexachlorocyclohexanes, methylene chloride, styrenes, organic and inorganic acids, fertilizers and their by-products, nitrogen by-products, vinyl chlorides, salts, dust, and cement in powder form, as well as radionuclides of uranium, radium, and radon.
They include nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde, and a wide range of alkanes, cycloalkanes, terpenes, aromatic compounds, and hydrocarbons.
The results of the risk-based sub-study shows that treating the more toxic aromatic-constituents of gasoline is significantly more effective and economical, relative to treating the less toxic alkanes and cycloalkanes.