Cyclothymia

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cyclothymia

[‚sī·klō′thī·mē·ə]
(psychology)
A disposition marked by alterations of mood between elation and depression out of proportion to apparent external events and stimulated, rather, by internal factors.

Cyclothymia

 

the term used in Soviet psychiatry to designate a mild form of manic-depressive psychosis. In other countries the same term is used in psychiatry to designate a variation from the psychic norm—namely, a predisposition to manic-depressive psychosis. The term “cyclothymic constitution” refers to one of the Kretschmer personality types (after the German psychiatrist E. Kretschmer, 1888–1964). As used by the German psychiatrist K. Schneider (1887–1967), the term “cyclothymia” may also refer to all manic-depressive states, ranging from slight fluctuations in mood to pronounced psychotic manifestations.

References in periodicals archive ?
Cyclothymic disorder: Validating criteria for inclusion in the bipolar affective group.
TEMPS-A scores in patient and control groups were analyzed by an independent samples t-test for depressive, hyperthymic, cyclothymic and irritable temperament profiles, whereas anxious temperament scores were compared by the Mann-Whitney U-test since they were not normally distributed.
Mental disorders purported to cause or accompany eccentricity in at least some instances include cyclothymic and bipolar disorders, Asperger's disorder, schizotypal and schizoid personality disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and schizophrenia.
The authors refer to their previous data showing lower levels of creativity in unipolar depression and a higher association between artistic creativity, eminence and bipolar type II disorder with cyclothymic or hyperthymic temperament.
But MP and DP patients scored significantly higher on cyclothymic and hyperthymic subscales than did UP patients.
In a patient with mild cyclothymic disorder, anxiety could respond to treatment with a mood stabilizer," Dr.
Klerman described a progression from normal happiness or joy through cyclothymic personality, nonpsychotic hypomania, psychotic mania and delirious mania (18).