daemon

(redirected from daemonic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

daemon

[′dē·mən]
(computer science)
In Unix, a program that runs in the background, such as a server.

daemon

(operating system)
/day'mn/ or /dee'mn/ (From the mythological meaning, later rationalised as the acronym "Disk And Execution MONitor") A program that is not invoked explicitly, but lies dormant waiting for some condition(s) to occur. The idea is that the perpetrator of the condition need not be aware that a daemon is lurking (though often a program will commit an action only because it knows that it will implicitly invoke a daemon).

For example, under ITS writing a file on the LPT spooler's directory would invoke the spooling daemon, which would then print the file. The advantage is that programs wanting files printed need neither compete for access to, nor understand any idiosyncrasies of, the LPT. They simply enter their implicit requests and let the daemon decide what to do with them. Daemons are usually spawned automatically by the system, and may either live forever or be regenerated at intervals.

Unix systems run many daemons, chiefly to handle requests for services from other hosts on a network. Most of these are now started as required by a single real daemon, inetd, rather than running continuously. Examples are cron (local timed command execution), rshd (remote command execution), rlogind and telnetd (remote login), ftpd, nfsd (file transfer), lpd (printing).

Daemon and demon are often used interchangeably, but seem to have distinct connotations (see demon). The term "daemon" was introduced to computing by CTSS people (who pronounced it /dee'mon/) and used it to refer to what ITS called a dragon.

daemon

Pronounced "dee-mun" as in the word for devil, as well as "day-mun," a daemon is a Unix/Linux program that executes in the background ready to perform an operation when required. Functioning like an extension to the operating system, a daemon is usually an unattended process that is initiated at startup. Typical daemons are print spoolers and e-mail handlers or a scheduler that starts up another process at a designated time. The term comes from Greek mythology, meaning "guardian spirit." See agent and mailer-daemon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Emblematic of the intervention of the Reformation in the intellectual life of Western Europe, it also shows the reaction of the writer of consciousness and supporter of reason to the daemonic writer insisting on inner conviction.
Neither of the land nor of the sea, but possessing both the stability of the one and the constant flux of the other--too immense, too filled with the vastness of the outer, to carry any sense of human handicraft--this strange territory of the Docks seems, indeed, to form a kind of fifth element, a place charged with daemonic issues and daemonic silences, where men move like puzzled slaves, fretting under orders they cannot understand, fumbling with great forces that have long passed out of their control .
AARON VLASAK, "Concerning Philosophic Hyperbole: Plato's Daemonic Socrates.
The article will then explore how real or historical and allegorical spaces and events reflect on a society; the role of the daemonic agent and its allegorical and real levels; and causality and magic as the links between the primary and secondary levels of meaning.
The distinctive aspect of "in the heavenlies" (en tois epouraniois) in contrast to "the heavens" (ouranoi) as area in which the drama of encounter with the daemonic powers is enacted, is certain to invite readers' attention.
Klawiter had referred to "that primordial daemonic urge inherent in all men that serves positively to activate the individual when properly restrained; an urge, however, that utterly destroys its victim if once allowed to gain control .
4) Enrico articulates the doctrinal preoccupation with the devil on the theme of "pact," which encouraged the parallel between daemonic practices and sacramental efficacity.
Enchanted by Geraldine, Christabel finds herself forced to mimic the daemonic woman's look of hate, while Edward, Mary, and Ellen in Coleridge's unfinished poem 'The Three Graves'--a poem that, like 'Christabel', is directly mentioned in Aylwin (p.
But modern criticism is also a weak form of humanism inasmuch as it is complacently blind to the daemonic forces that undermine human history and personality from within.
Further, as in other European daemonic traditions, we find that the Devil cannot, in fact, take on a human form, and is thus also identifiable by features peculiar to a facsimile built of base materials like water and earth (26).
1, 2003, at 21; Jennifer Wallace, Daemonic Desire In The Bedroom, Or Just Consumer Choice?