daguerreotype


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daguerreotype

one of the earliest photographic processes, in which the image was produced on iodine-sensitized silver and developed in mercury vapour

Daguerreotype

 

the first commercially developed and widely used photographic process, now only of historical interest. The daguerreotype was invented in the 1830’s by L. J. Daguerre on the basis of experiments by N.Niepce. Information on the invention of the daguerreotype was made public in 1839, which is regarded as the year of the invention of photography.

daguerreotype

[də′ger·ə‚tīp]
(graphic arts)
A photograph produced on a silver plate or a copper plate coated with silver sensitized by the action of iodine; after exposure of the plate in a camera, a latent image is developed by use of mercury vapor.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the daguerreotypes could not be reproduced.
An early collaborator with Morse, Draper pushed the boundaries of early daguerreotype technology by capturing astronomical images of the moon and solar system.
This synthesis, this rejection of categories, which Whitman championed in section 16 of "Song of Myself," becomes visible in one of the most fully collaborative artifacts in the War Memoranda exhibition: Danh's daguerreotype rendering of Schultz's poem "Amulet" (see Figure 1).
One of the most covetable works of photographic history is Paris Et Le Daguerreotype, published by Paris-Musees in 1989.
In 1851, the advent of the wet-collodion glass plate negative process merged the fine detail of the daguerreotype with the calotype's potential for mass-production.
Early photographs include an 1843 daguerreotype of a veiled Egyptian woman and an 1853 image by British photographer Roger Fenton entitled Pasha and Bedouin.
Visitors will be able to view, for example, letters penned by George Washington, a copy of the Declaration of Independence in the handwriting of Thomas Jefferson, and ambrotype and daguerreotype images of Abraham Lincoln.
Dinius, The Camera and the Press: American Visual and Print Culture in the Age of the Daguerreotype, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012, pp.
Several people attempted to turn the otherwise unique daguerreotype plate into an engraved matrix capable of generating ink-on-paper prints.
For example, a cyanotype made by botanist Anna Atkins while she was studying flora in Ceylon in 1850 was exhibited next to a salt print of the Arch of Titus made the same year by Giacomo Caneva, while an encased daguerreotype portrait of three men from 1850 by an unknown artist stood near a large-format photogravure of Alfred Stieglitz's The Steerage, taken in 1907 but printed in 1912, and a light drawing made by Barbara Morgan in 1940 hung next to a brightly-colored abstract dye-transfer drawing made by Clarence John Laughlin in 1944.
Among the new works is Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey's 1843 daguerreotype titled Ayoucha.