daguerreotype

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daguerreotype

one of the earliest photographic processes, in which the image was produced on iodine-sensitized silver and developed in mercury vapour

Daguerreotype

 

the first commercially developed and widely used photographic process, now only of historical interest. The daguerreotype was invented in the 1830’s by L. J. Daguerre on the basis of experiments by N.Niepce. Information on the invention of the daguerreotype was made public in 1839, which is regarded as the year of the invention of photography.

daguerreotype

[də′ger·ə‚tīp]
(graphic arts)
A photograph produced on a silver plate or a copper plate coated with silver sensitized by the action of iodine; after exposure of the plate in a camera, a latent image is developed by use of mercury vapor.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, a cyanotype made by botanist Anna Atkins while she was studying flora in Ceylon in 1850 was exhibited next to a salt print of the Arch of Titus made the same year by Giacomo Caneva, while an encased daguerreotype portrait of three men from 1850 by an unknown artist stood near a large-format photogravure of Alfred Stieglitz's The Steerage, taken in 1907 but printed in 1912, and a light drawing made by Barbara Morgan in 1940 hung next to a brightly-colored abstract dye-transfer drawing made by Clarence John Laughlin in 1944.
So there was excitement at Stockport auctioneers Maxwells when a group of daguerreotype stereoscopic slides turned up, some signed with the initials "DS".
Unlike daguerreotypes, ambrotypes were relatively cheap and framed examples were soon being sold for sixpence, making them the first truly popular photographs, available to most levels of society.
In its first incarnation, in the mid-19th century, the daguerreotype was a one-off photograph made on a metallic plate.
Daguerreotypes received from space, he reported, showed that it was a kind of paradise:
The imagery of sun and shadow, pervasive throughout the Idylls, had new meaning to the nineteenth-century audience, thanks to the proliferation of daguerreotypes by the 1840s and 1850s.
Women in Pants is a collection of over 150 photographs collected by Catherine Smith and Cynthia Grieg, and includes daguerreotypes from as early as the mid-19th century and the full range of photographic types--cartes de visites, postcards, gelatin silver prints, boudoir cards, and so on--as photographic technology advanced.
For example, mirror images in daguerreotypes often lead to confusing photos involving musical instruments.
Daguerreotypes of Frederick Douglass and John Brown have sold for $184,000 and $129,000, respectively.
Beginning with an examination of the daguerreotypes of the Mexican-American War and closing with a selective survey of the nineteenth century illustrated book, Sandweiss delves into the ways in which American's pre-existing ideas and desires concerning the West influenced how photographs of the new territory would be made, marketed, and interpreted.