daguerreotype

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daguerreotype

one of the earliest photographic processes, in which the image was produced on iodine-sensitized silver and developed in mercury vapour

Daguerreotype

 

the first commercially developed and widely used photographic process, now only of historical interest. The daguerreotype was invented in the 1830’s by L. J. Daguerre on the basis of experiments by N.Niepce. Information on the invention of the daguerreotype was made public in 1839, which is regarded as the year of the invention of photography.

daguerreotype

[də′ger·ə‚tīp]
(graphic arts)
A photograph produced on a silver plate or a copper plate coated with silver sensitized by the action of iodine; after exposure of the plate in a camera, a latent image is developed by use of mercury vapor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Soon, the daguerreotype gained popularity across Europe and the US and by 1850.
The ghazal form in which "Amulet" is written traditionally calls for each couplet to be autonomous, yet linked by refrain, which can be seen as a verbal instantiation of the daguerreotype process, as each requires, and invites, the discovery of meaning via a repetitious development of image that accrues over time and across space.
As well as recording their discovery, and describing the laborious restoration of the fragile images, the Jacobsons have provided a catalogue raisonne of all 325 of Ruskin's known daguerreotypes.
For example, a cyanotype made by botanist Anna Atkins while she was studying flora in Ceylon in 1850 was exhibited next to a salt print of the Arch of Titus made the same year by Giacomo Caneva, while an encased daguerreotype portrait of three men from 1850 by an unknown artist stood near a large-format photogravure of Alfred Stieglitz's The Steerage, taken in 1907 but printed in 1912, and a light drawing made by Barbara Morgan in 1940 hung next to a brightly-colored abstract dye-transfer drawing made by Clarence John Laughlin in 1944.
So there was excitement at Stockport auctioneers Maxwells when a group of daguerreotype stereoscopic slides turned up, some signed with the initials "DS".
As Alan Trachtenberg explains, early daguerreotypes were viewed as a "kind of magic realism" (20), often arousing "a strange response, a shudder rather than a smile of pleasure" (23-24).
Unlike daguerreotypes, ambrotypes were relatively cheap and framed examples were soon being sold for sixpence, making them the first truly popular photographs, available to most levels of society.
In its first incarnation, in the mid-19th century, the daguerreotype was a one-off photograph made on a metallic plate.
Digitised resources include daguerreotypes, historic reports, manuscripts, letters and even diaries of polar expeditions, which are in danger of being lost forever.
Through early daguerreotypes, glass plates and magic lantern slides, we have a striking compilation of familiar famous faces, as well as a few unsung heroes, such as Tom Crean, Matthew Henson and Frank Wild.
The collection leads visitors through daguerreotypes and rare paper prints from photography's experimental beginnings in France and England in the 1830s through the fine art and social documentary traditions of the 20th century and into the present day with work by some of the most important artists of our time.