damper pedal

damper pedal

[′dam·pər ‚ped·əl]
(engineering)
A pedal that controls the damping of piano strings.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the three pedals found on most pianos, the damper pedal on the correct lifts all the felt dampers over the strings, enabling them all to vibrate uninhibitedly; the left pedal moves the console and activity sideways to empower the mallet to strike just a single of the a few harmony strings of every tenor and treble key (the bass notes are just single-hung); and the center pedal (by and large accessible on excellent pianos yet in addition found on some upright pianos) typically holds up the dampers just of those keys discouraged when the pedal is discouraged.
We pianists tend to "park" on the damper pedal when we are nervous, underprepared, or both; a reminder about clarity here is very helpful.
Gunn exhaustively explores each possible affekt and how it is connected to and influenced by formal structure, harmonic function, key, technique, rhythm, dynamics, expression marks, articulation, ornaments, the damper pedal and tempo.
Some of the concepts taught include posture, hand position, counting quarter, half, whole, eighth notes and rests, note reading with pre-staff notation and note reading on the grand staff, dynamics and expression marks, legato, staccato, and slur phrasing, and use of the damper pedal.
The Debussy selections are expressive and appropriately atmospheric, aided by a subtle and effective use of the damper pedal.
Teaching the Piano's Damper Pedal at Conservatories and Authorized Music Education Centers in Canary Islands (Spain)
He enlarged the range and dynamic possibilities of the instrument and added a damper pedal for the strings.
T: Sometime try sitting at a piano, and hold down the damper pedal (the one on the right that makes it hold notes).
True, Czerny admired Beethoven's ability to 'connect full chords to each other without the use of the pedal' and reproved those who couldn't even connect four simple parts with their fingers because they had depended on the damper pedal so much that 'a pure and classical performance with the fingers only [had] been almost totally neglected'; but these views reflect Czerny's own Viennese ideals of 'neatness, clarity, and refinement'.
The high school or middle school pianist of intermediate ability who tackles these pieces will have to work with improvisation (in carefully controlled contexts), unmetered notation, enlarged accidentals that apply to an entire staff, unstemmed notes, and special effects (in this instance, allowing the piano lid to fall, while the damper pedal is down, causing the strings to resonate).
The notes on performance are evidently intended for pianists, although questions of instrumental medium are avoided (nothing is said about use of the damper pedal, for example).
24, feature layers of sound, the melodic line accompanied by a flowing broken chord accompaniment divided between the hands, blended by the use of the damper pedal.