Danaids

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Danaids

 

in Greek mythology, the 50 daughters of Danaus, son of the Egyptian king Belus. In an attempt to escape the pursuit of the 50 sons of Aegyptus, the brother of Danaus. the Danaids and their father fled to Argos, where they were overtaken by Aegyptus’ sons who demanded that Danaus give his daughters to them in marriage. Bowing to force, Danaus agreed to the marriage of his daughters, but ordered them to kill their husbands on their wedding night. All of the Danaids except one, who became the progenitrix of the kings of Argos, carried out their father’s command. According to one version of the myth, the Daxiaids had to atone for their crime by eternally filling a bottomless jar with water in the underworld. This is the origin of the expressions “a Danaid jar” and “labor of the Danaids,” which signify useless and unending labor.

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The only exception is the statues of the Danaids, whose myth cannot easily be linked to the god; this point will be discussed below.
31 only that of the Danaids is not obviously linked to Apollo or any myth associated with him.
Richardson (1977:302) assures us that there is 'no special connexion between the Danaids and Apollo', but this is not completely correct.
This reference to Africa is repeated in the adjective Libyci applied to the ivory of the temple doors and the story of the Danaids is also linked to Africa.
Zanker (1988:85) contends that there had been a statue specifically of Apollo Actius in the complex near the statues of the Danaids and associates this statue with depictions of the god on a denarius (RIC2 365-6) which is clearly identified as Apollo Actius.