dandelion


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dandelion

[Eng. form of Fr.,=lion's tooth], any plant of the genus Taraxacum of the family Asteraceae (asteraster
[Gr.,=star], common name for the Asteraceae (Compositae), the aster family, in North America, name for plants of the genus Aster, sometimes called wild asters, and for a related plant more correctly called China aster (Callistephus chinensis
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 family), perennial herbs of wide distribution in temperate regions. The dandelion has a rosette of deep-toothed leaves (the name is usually attributed to this) and a bright yellow flower followed in fruit by a round head of white down, an adaptation for wind distribution of the seedlike fruits. The common dandelion (T. officinale) is native to Europe but widely naturalized. Although it is considered in the N United States chiefly as a lawn pest because of the easily dispersed seeds and the deep root, it is also cultivated both for medicine and for food. The young leaves resemble chicory and are used for salad greens and as a potherb, especially in Europe. The roots may be roasted and used as a coffee substitute. The flower heads are utilized for dandelion wine and are good forage for bees. In medicine the roots have been dried and used chiefly as a bitter tonic and laxative. The Russian dandelion (T. kok-saghyz) has been cultivated for the milky juice typical of the genus, as a source of rubber. Dandelions are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Asterales, family Asteraceae.

dandelion

traditional symbol of flirtation. [Flower Symbolism: Jobes, 413]

dandelion

symbol of grief. [Flower Symbolism: Jobes, 413]
See: Grief

dandelion

1. a plant, Taraxacum officinale, native to Europe and Asia and naturalized as a weed in North America, having yellow rayed flowers and deeply notched basal leaves, which are used for salad or wine: family Asteraceae (composites)
2. any of several similar related plants
References in periodicals archive ?
It's the leaves of a dandelion that are the edible part, so I munched my way into one.
It is the indented leaves, however, that provide the common name dandelion - dent-de-lion (teeth of the lion).
The website says the tincture, which contains dandelion and artichoke, is "a food supplement to help eliminate toxins and aid digestion".
Peppermint, dandelion root, liquorice root and chamomile combine with milk thistle and the age-old remedy centaury herb to detoxify the body.
Fluid retention and pain can be relieved with a combination of Evening Primrose Oil and Dandelion Herb Tea.
In the past decade, Pink Dandelion, program leader in the Centre for Postgraduate Quaker Studies at the venerable Woodbrooke Quaker Studies Centre in Birmingham, England, has established himself as one of, if not the most, prolific and provocative scholars of Quakerism working today.
The product contains all-natural ingredients, including green tea, dandelion and asparagus, which help eliminate excess water.
A SINGLE dandelion left to seed can reproduce 10,000 times.
The false dandelion has white petals and a yellow center with parachute-like seeds and hard-to-remove taproots, not to be confused with the dandelion whose colors are inverted.
It's a blooming marvellous spring for taraxacum, aka the humble, ubiquitous dandelion.
A dandelion is actually not one flower but many; each yellow petal strip is actually an individual flower.
Nancy's dad made dandelion wine north of Syracuse years ago, and when we first moved back to the upper Hudson Valley, a neighbor served us some at a dinner party.