dark adaptation

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dark adaptation

The process by which the iris and the retina of the eye adjust to allow maximum vision in dim illumination following exposure of the eye to a relatively brighter illumination. In darkness, vision becomes more sensitive to light, provided a person has not been exposed to bright light for some time. Although exposure to total darkness for at least 30 minutes is required for complete dark adaptation, a pilot can achieve a moderate degree within 20 minutes under dim red cockpit lighting. Dark adaptation is impaired by exposure to cabin pressure altitudes above 5000 ft, carbon monoxide inhaled in smoking and from exhaust fumes, deficiency of vitamin A in the diet, and prolonged exposure to bright sunlight.
References in periodicals archive ?
Suppose that the illumination of the dark-adapted leaf is done with a light flash intense enough to close all the reaction centers (a saturating flash) through multiple turnovers of the PSII.
Figure 3 shows a typical response of fluorescence intensity to a saturating flash of a dark-adapted leaf, plotted on different timescales.
The observed gold particles falling on different domains in light- and dark-adapted retinas were used to test the null hypothesis of no difference in phosducin labelling distributions between the two study groups.
Results of TEM analysis of gold particle probes localising phosducin in the selected domains of light-and dark-adapted groups are summarised in Tables 2-4.
Just a short time after, your eyes should be fully dark-adapted and ready to view the stars to the maximum limit of your vision.
Any bright lights will ruin your dark-adapted eyesight and you'll be right back to square one.
A DARK-ADAPTED EYE Barbara Vine A story of sibling rivalries and social class, this novel looks back at one family's darkest hour through the eyes of one of its younger members.
Since fossil findings indicate that both young and old dinosaurs were at the Alaska site in great numbers and over a long period of time, says Allison, "you have to consider the possibility that, unless they engaged in some huge mass migration every year, they were dark-adapted.
The dark-adapted naked eye has an aperture about 7mm in diameter (the pupil), and stars down to about magnitude +6.