dashpot


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dashpot

[′dash‚pät]
(mechanical engineering)
A device used to dampen and control a motion, in which an attached piston is loosely fitted to move slowly in a cylinder containing oil.

dashpot

A mechanical, hydraulic, or pneumatic damper used to cushion or slow down mechanical movement by restricting the flow of viscous fluid. Dashpots are used in shimmy dampers and in some power control systems, where they come into operation at high speeds to prevent pilot-induced oscillations. See dashpot throttle.
References in periodicals archive ?
1951), the visco-elastic behavior of a fiber (or yarn) is described by a spring (with elastic modulus E) and a dashpot (with damping constant or viscosity [eta]) in series.
The hook came down, and, as it moved, I lost my grip and watched as 800 pounds of dashpot pressure slammed down the Tomcat's tailhook point.
They used a hardness testing machine described as having a deadweight system counterbalanced by a dashpot, although the machine had a rather fast standard rate of 0.
The prepreg lay up can be sketched as a dashpot and a spring in parallel (a Maxwell-Voigt viscoelastic element).
The elastic modulus (G') is the spring, the loss modulus (G") is the dashpot, and the dynamic modulus (G*) represents the total applied force.
The contact between two material particles is modelled by a spring and dashpot in both the normal and tangential directions and using an additional slider in tangential direction (Fig 1).
Actuator elements are engineering elements (like contact or dashpot elements) that replicate linear extension and contraction movement in three-dimensional space, typical motion for hydraulic and pneumatic cylinders and for electric solenoids.
Limited tenders are invited for ms dashpot component
i] along each branch of the mechanical model, where [eta] is the dampening constant of the dashpot.
In their model the structure is modelled as an elastoplastic single-degree-of-freedom system (SDOF) and the soil beneath the structure is modelled by a discrete model combining different spring and dashpot elements.
If the spring supplies a restoring force proportional to its elongation and the dashpot (electromagnetic damper) provides a force which opposes motion of the mass proportional to its velocity, then the system response is proportional to the excitation, and the system is said to be linear [29, 30].