Deadweight

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Deadweight

 

the gross weight of a ship’s cargo.

The deadweight, in causing a ship to settle to its summer load line in seawater, is an indicator of a freighter’s dimensions and its basic operational characteristic. Quantitatively, the deadweight is equal to the difference between the water displacement and the ship’s own weight, including its machinery and equipment ready for operation (along with pipelines filled with fuel, water in the boilers cooling the pipelines, etc.). The principal part of the deadweight of a freighter is the weight of the cargo; on a passenger ship the weight of the cargo (passengers and baggage) amounts to the lesser part of the deadweight, whereas its greater part is made up by the supplies expended by the ship (fuel and water).

References in periodicals archive ?
All of the weights for each of the six NIST deadweight machines had their masses determined in 1965 and 1966 by the mass laboratory at NIST, which was called the National Bureau of Standards prior to 1988.
The deadweight masses were determined by comparisons with U.
Thus the standard uncertainty in the applied force that is associated with the uncertainty in the determination of the deadweight masses is no greater than 0.
The question of whether the deadweight masses change with time must be addressed.
In order to more completely address the question of stability of NIST's deadweight masses, the 2.
Since the larger NIST deadweight machines would incur smaller relative mass changes than the 2.
Calibration forces are generated in this machine by serially applying deadweights from two different stacks.
All deadweights in this machine are applied sequentially with no further individual manipulation possible.
The main lifting frame raises hydraulically to pick up additional deadweights in the stack.
These calibrations were performed in 1965 prior to the assembly of the deadweights in the machines.
The 498 kN deadweight machine was partially disassembled in 1971, and again in 1979 and in 1989, with most of its deadweights removed and recalibrated each time.
448 MN incorporate the uncertainties associated with the determination of the mass of the deadweights, the acceleration due to gravity, and the air density as follows: