deaf


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Related to deaf: Deaf culture, Tone deaf

deaf

partially or totally unable to hear
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References in classic literature ?
There is nothing like the fearful inclination of your tall spars overloaded with canvas to bring a deaf man and an angry one to their senses.
Well, a dog that isn't deaf doesn't like it--gets excited, smells round, barks, growls.
The old gentleman let him talk for some time, and then remarked, in a tone of rapturous enjoyment: "Stone deaf," and added, "Nasty things.
There ought to be a law against anyone being as deaf as that.
What does the Family Guide say about entertaining your rich, deaf old aunt?
The combination was queerly suggestive of a sexton; but when Brown remembered the deaf servant who dug potatoes, he thought it natural enough.
Not less blind to the tears, or less deaf to every entreaty of Sophia was the politic aunt, nor less determined was she to deliver over the trembling maid into the arms of the gaoler Blifil.
Yes, Natalia Victorovna, he shall need somebody when they dismiss him, on crutches and stone deaf from the hospital.
This was the period, about three months after she had commenced, that the first report of her case was made, in which it was stated that "she has just learned the manual alphabet, as used by the deaf mutes, and it is a subject of delight and wonder to see how rapidly, correctly, and eagerly, she goes on with her labours.
Then he imparted his design concerning Dolly to Miss Miggs, who was taken more deaf than before, when he began; and so remained, all through.
The old lady, who was much less deaf on this subject than on any other, replied in the affirmative.
Here, woman,' he said, 'here's your deaf and dumb son.