deal


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Deal,

town (1991 pop. 26,311), Kent, SE England, on the Downs, an important passage for Channel shipping. It is a popular holiday resort. There is some boat building. Other industries include brush making, the production of plastics, and precision engineering. Deal is the reputed landing place of Julius Caesar in 55 B.C. and a later member of the Cinque PortsCinque Ports
[O. Fr.,=five ports], name applied to an association of maritime towns in Sussex and Kent, SE England. They originally numbered five: Hastings, Romney (now New Romney), Hythe, Dover, and Sandwich. The association was informally organized in the 11th cent.
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. Henry VIII had three castles built in the area: Deal Castle, Walmer Castle (seat of the lord warden of the Cinque Ports), and Sandown Castle (which has been washed away). From the 17th to the early 19th cent., Deal was an important supply and service center for ships anchored at the Downs.

deal

[dēl]
(design engineering)
A face on which numbers are registered by means of a pointer.
A disk usually with a series of markings around its border, which can be turned to regulate the operation of a machine or electrical device.

deal

1.(US) Pine or fir lumber cut to a specified size, usually at least 3 in. (76 mm) thick and 9 in. (229 mm) wide.
2. (Brit.) Square-sawn softwood lumber, 17/8 in. (47.6 mm) to 4 in. (101.6 mm) thick and 9 in. (228.6 mm) to under 11 in. (279.4 mm) wide.

deal

1
Cards
a. the process of distributing the cards
b. a player's turn to do this
c. a single round in a card game

deal

2
1. a plank of softwood timber, such as fir or pine, or such planks collectively
2. the sawn wood of various coniferous trees, such as that from the Scots pine (red deal) or from the Norway Spruce (white deal)

Deal

a town in SE England, in Kent, on the English Channel: two 16th-century castles: tourism, light industries. Pop.: 96 670 (2003 est.)
References in classic literature ?
There are people in the world who will take a great deal of trouble to point out the faults in a religion or a language, and then go blandly about their business without suggesting any remedy.
But I herewith discharge my conscience, and declare that I have had quite enthusiastic movements of admiration towards old gentlemen who spoke the worst English, who were occasionally fretful in their temper, and who had never moved in a higher sphere of influence than that of parish overseer; and that the way in which I have come to the conclusion that human nature is lovable--the way I have learnt something of its deep pathos, its sublime mysteries--has been by living a great deal among people more or less commonplace and vulgar, of whom you would perhaps hear nothing very surprising if you were to inquire about them in the neighbourhoods where they dwelt.
His chief impression with regard to ascertaining those mysterious correlatives of his familiar English vocables which were current in this extraordinary city of Paris was, that it was simply a matter of a good deal of unwonted and rather ridiculous muscular effort on his own part.
This declaration brought on a loud and overpowering reply, of which no part was very distinct, except the frequent exclamations, amounting almost to oaths, which adorned it, and Catherine was left, when it ended, with rather a strengthened belief of there being a great deal of wine drunk in Oxford, and the same happy conviction of her brother's comparative sobriety.
In Italy he drinks a little too much wine, and in Germany he drinks a great deal too much beer.
There was a delightful history of Ohio, stuffed with tales of the pioneer times, which was a good deal in the hands of us boys; and there was a book of Western Adventure, full of Indian fights and captivities, which we wore to pieces.
People are thrown together a good deal on a voyage like this.
It was your deal all right, and you-all dole them right, too.
Then," said the Hard Man to Deal With, "why are you so anxious to have your Company bet me money that it will not?
The laws of traditional physics, in the form in which they deal with movements of matter or electricity, have an apparent simplicity which somewhat conceals the empirical character of what they assert.
Dobbin, with a great deal of hesitation and stuttering, protested that he was not in the least hungry or thirsty; that he had no business to transact; that he only came to ask if Mr.
Anna devoted just as much care to her appearance when they had no visitors, and she did a great deal of reading, both of novels and of what serious literature was in fashion.