death assemblage

death assemblage

[′deth ə‚sem·blij]
(paleontology)
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The aims of the study were to understand if the sampled death assemblage is descriptive of the original population, if it may be traced to a mass mortality episode.
Effect of a large larval settlement and catastrophic mortality on the ecologic record of the community in the death assemblage.
However, the gravel bar death assemblage is more similar in taxonomic composition to the life assemblages than to the other two death assemblages, suggesting that the gravel bar approximates the present day composition of the local mollusc fauna ecosystem more closely than either the bay or lagoonal death assemblages.
If bird predation can be detected through indirect and noninvasive means, especially in intertidal habitats, it would be possible to determine whether the death assemblage is biased, with respect to body size or species, which can then be corrected for accordingly in paleoecological and historical ecological studies.
Many of the species found at Shelly Beach were recorded only as dead shells, either as part of death assemblages or as fresh shells on the strandline.
A statewide assessment of marine intertidal molluscan death assemblages by Smith (2009) found the Port Macquarie area to have a relatively low species diversity of near-coastal marine molluscs compared to neighboring areas to both the north and south, and he conjectured that this might be related to a low amount of near-shore reef habitat resulting in absence or scarcity of some rocky habitat species in local death assemblages.
Shell fragments are very common in modern death assemblages (Tauber 1942; Hollmann 1968; Pilkey et al.
Taphonomy of recent freshwater molluscan death assemblages Touro Passo Stream Southern Brazil.
We have recently discovered two modern death assemblages containing dead Chrysemys picta (painted turtle), and with a view toward comparing these sites with fossil turtle death assemblages, we recorded position, orientation of the carapace (upside down or right-side up), presence or absence of non-shell elements and degree of shell disarticulation.
We make note of this because anurans are often found in aquatic death assemblages, and their presence or absence in an obviously aquatic death site provides clues about the composition of a given local ecosystem.
Moreover, Grill and Zuschin (2001) studied bivalve death assemblages in the Red Sea between shallow and deep settings.
Preservation of community structure in modern reef coral life and death assemblages of Florida Keys: implications for the Quaternary fossil record of coral reefs.