death instinct


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death instinct

[′deth ‚in‚stinkt]
(psychology)
In psychoanalytic theory, the unconscious drive which leads the individual toward dissolution and death, and which coexists with the life instinct.
References in periodicals archive ?
The death instinct unties the object relations, and the life instinct reties them.
Klein (1945) refers to the death instinct in relation to the development of both Anxiety and guilt.
It is the interpretation of the fulfillment of sexual drives which implies that death and libido and death instinct are one and the same in that family, as in H.
The text plays with the tension between the pleasure principle and the death instinct, showing that Pym's motions are governed by the compulsion to repeat; however, if the Freudian notion of repetition--as a source of terror--is linked to the uncanny and Gothic sublimity, Pym's lack of closure points--rather than to Eros or Thanatos--to the postmodern trapping of the subject in an incessant pattern of repetitions and duplications, in which the ultimate denouement is forever deferred and postponed.
Just as Pym's portrayal of horror leads to the domains of the sublime, its exploration of the death instincts anticipates Freud's speculations in Beyond the Pleasure Principle.
One of the central themes is their interpretation of Freud's later theory of instinct, the theory of life and death instincts that he formulated in 1920.
There on the tube was the universe from which he'd been banished: nubile chainsaw massacres and nightmares on Elm Street, tabloid news shows serving up slo-mo reenactments of the sex crimes of the day, misogynist rappers and hate comics reciting brutal nursery rhymes, the basic death instincts on parade like so many Robocops of the id.