decade


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decade

1. a period of ten consecutive years
2. a group or series of ten

Decade

 

(1) A ten-day period. During the French Revolution, the week was replaced by the decade.

(2) A group of ten—in antiquity, a group of soldiers, for example.

(3) A ten-day period of time devoted to some social event or special occasion—for example, a decade of Ukrainian literature or a decade of Azerbaijani music.

decade

[de′kād]
(electricity)
A group or assembly of 10 units; for example, a decade counter counts 10 in one column, and a decade box inserts resistance quantities in multiples of powers of 10.
(science and technology)
The interval between any two quantities having the ratio of 10 to 1.
References in classic literature ?
Lastly, in the concluding decade of the sixteenth century, came a series of realistic stories depicting chiefly, in more or less farcical spirit, the life of the poorer classes.
The significance of 'The Shepherd's Calendar' lies partly in its genuine feeling for external Nature, which contrasts strongly with the hollow conventional phrases of the poetry of the previous decade, and especially in the vigor, the originality, and, in some of the eclogues, the beauty, of the language and of the varied verse.
In the last decade, especially, of the century, no other lyric form compared in popularity with the sonnet.
The last decade of the sixteenth century presents also, in the poems of John Donne,
The zest for lyric poetry somewhat artificially inaugurated at Court by Wyatt and Surrey seems to have largely subsided, like any other fad, after some years, but it vigorously revived, in much more genuine fashion, with the taste for other imaginative forms of literature, in the last two decades of Elizabeth's reign.
And it made Martin feel sheepish--the way he had felt that afternoon, decades ago, as he sat in the bakery eating a chocolate ice-cream soda and watching her walk across the Square.
While she slept, six decades or more had rolled back and she was again in her girlhood; suddenly recalled from it she was dizzy, as with the rush of the years.
Sara, at the time I met her, was a buxom, phlegmatic spinster of sixty, equipped with an experience so tragic and unusual that though her tongue ran on for decades its output would still be of imperishable interest to her cronies.
I do not meet in these late decades such company over a pipe.
Two decades of puppet government are enervating, I admit, but they only pave the way more surely to the inevitable reaction.
Such a warning is not abstract, as Japan's recent lost decade of growth prior to financial reform shows.