deception

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deception

[di′sep·shən]
(electronics)
The deliberate radiation, reradiation, alteration, absorption, or reflection of electromagnetic energy in a manner intended to mislead an enemy in the interpretation of information received by his electronic systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
allegedly violated the FTC Act by deceptively advertising that consumers could finance a purchase with low monthly payments when, in fact, the payments were temporary "teasers" after which the consumer would owe a much higher amount, by several hundred dollars.
This deceptively simple formula requires focus, hard work and courage.
Hume makes profound points in a deceptively simple way.
The loans have a deceptively high cost, provide only a marginal benefit and are marketed mainly to lower income taxpayer, who are least able to afford them.
His laconic, heavy-lidded manner was deceptively casual, disguising a potent screen presence.
THIS three-storey terraced home, in Lemington, west of Newcastle, is deceptively spacious and would be ideal for a range of tenants from a family to professionals looking to share.
DECEPTIVELY spacious, this five bedroom end terraced property offers wellmaintained accommodation of a good size and boasts many traditional period features.
He Poos Clouds whips pizzicato strings, snare drums, woodwinds, and his light but affecting tenor into deceptively complex yet frothy-sounding pop concoctions, all inspired by being the butt of many a mean-spirited teen-movie joke.
Lee and Rhea Anastas, and supertheorist Paul Virilio--is a corrective to such a view, and it nicely complements Le Va's carefully calibrated, deceptively precise, and cognitively satisfying work.
The deceptively thin Schott's Original Miscellany is a large and delightful collection of bizarre, interesting, or even sometimes useful bits of trivia such as how to wrap a sari, the knights of the Round Table, a discussion on pencil hardness and a the "to be or not to be" speech presented in Pig Latin.
Moss decidedly breathes life into this character and her words with an achingly delicious and deceptively fragile economy: 'I'm sewing muscle into my cocoon, / powerful muscles of my thoughts.
As in the case of Fermat's last theorem, centuries of effort may go into proving such tantalizing, deceptively simple conjectures in number theory (SN: 11/5/94, p.