decidable


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decidable

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Considering the broad scope of the set of data types defined in [8], including functions, however, it is clear that not every data type has a decidable homomorphism.
Since the discussion never can be concerned with anything else than a very positive and very decidable question (are we wandering away from, or coming closer to Mecca?
Since in classical deducible research, a theory T of language L is said complete if any sentence of L is decidable in T, we can say that an S-denied theory is partially complete (or has some degrees of completeness and degrees of incompleteness).
Finally, there is a certain sterility at this point in debating what is as of yet not fully decidable, and no one has done more than Brown to demonstrate that the field of hadith studies has many fields to plow besides the (perhaps) exhausted one of authenticity.
Even when a problem is decidable and thus computationally solvable in principle, it may not be solvable in practice if the solution requires an inordinate amount of time or memory.
In an early work, The Wake of Imagination, (18) Kearney calls for a restoration of human imagination in the wake of deconstruction as an ethical responsibility: "If the deconstruction of imagination admits no epistemological limits (in so far as it undermines every effort to establish a decidable relationship between image and reality), it must recognize ethical limits.
Reducing FOTPL to decidable (monodic) fragments yields models where inference is often intractable (Hodkinson et al.
SOD advocates also argue that in EBAO the decision procedures are closed, complete, and decidable, while in SOD critical methods remain open and incomplete.
Significantly and famously for Hamlet, though, that search for singularity in agency, which initial enunciation of a simple binary infers to be also (easily) decidable, proves, as the soliloquy unfolds, impossible to achieve.
In particular, he holds that although some decidable propositions have a determinate truth-value (and thus sustain bivalence) even when it has not in fact been established, many propositions are such that they come to be true only when their truth is established.
In order to fully derive the meanings of the DVRs, the underspecification must be decidable without access to the syntactic context.