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Inflammation of the endometrium.



inflammation of the endometrium—the mucous membrane of the uterus. Endometritis usually results from streptococcal, staphylococcal, gonococcal, or some other infection reaching the uterus after an abortion or complicated childbirth. It sometimes is a complication of another infectious disease, for example, tuberculosis. A focus of inflammation arises at the site of penetration of the causative agent; it may involve not only the endometrium but the muscular layer of the uterus as well.

Endometritis may be acute, subacute, or chronic. Acute endometritis is associated with malaise, weakness, elevated body temperature, pain in the lower abdomen, and prolonged vaginal bleeding. Pain and high temperature are usually absent in chronic endometritis; menorrhagia occurs as a result of decreased contractility of the uterine muscles and slow detachment of the mucous membrane. Endometritis is frequently combined with salpingo-oophoritis, and it may result in sterility. In tuberculous endometritis developing in childhood, the uterine mucous membrane may disappear completely because of extensive cicatrization; primary amenorrhea may result. Menorrhagia and metrorrhagia occur when the endometrium is affected at the child-bearing age.

Treatment depends on the nature and stage of the disease; it may involve the use of antibiotics or physical therapy. The disease can be prevented by making sure that the causative agents do not enter the body during childbirth or abortion.


Ginekologiia. Moscow, 1957.