deciduous teeth


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Related to deciduous teeth: Permanent teeth

deciduous teeth

[di′sij·ə·wəs ′tēth]
(anatomy)
Teeth of a young mammal which are shed and replaced by permanent teeth. Also known as milk teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
We identified 1422 deciduous teeth, 74 permanent teeth and 350 petrous bones, as well as smaller numbers of other skeletal elements representing a minimum number of 372 individuals (Supplementary Tables S1 & S2; Smith et al.
The effectiveness of different thickness of mineral trioxide aggregate on coronal leakage in endodontically treated deciduous teeth.
19 In human biology, by what name are the deciduous teeth we lose before adulthood more commonly known?
A supernumerary tooth in the nasal cavity could result from obstruction at the time of tooth eruption because of crowded dentition, persistent deciduous teeth, trauma, a developmental disturbance such as cleft palate, or a genetic predisposition.
Most of them (87%) knew that deciduous teeth should be treated as permanent ones, but only 65.
There are few comparisons of deciduous teeth of Camelops in the literature.
London, Nov 3 (ANI): Researchers have confirmed that members of our species - Homo sapiens - arrived in Europe several millennia earlier than previously thought after re-analyses of two ancient deciduous teeth.
A As a young adult,yourYorkie likely has a common problem where the baby or deciduous teeth have not been pushed out by the adult teeth during teething,resulting in the extra teeth you mention.
Due to its biocompatibility it is accepted as a material of choice for restoration of root caries, non-carious cervical lesions, restoration of cervical caries in deciduous teeth [8, 9, 10]
The tumor has been associated with multiple teeth, impacted molars, and deciduous teeth.
Like us, the baby, or deciduous teeth are gradually replaced by the adult or permanent dentition.
Dental Procedures for Which Endocarditis Prophylaxis Is Reasonable for Patients in Table 11 All dental procedures that involve manipulation of gingival tissue or the periapical region of teeth or perforation of the oral mucosa The following procedures and events do not need prophylaxis: routine anesthetic injections through noninfected tissue, taking dental radiographs, placement of removable prosthodontic or orthodontic appliances, adjustment of orthodontic appliances, placement of orthodontic brackets, shedding of deciduous teeth, and bleeding from trauma to the lips or oral mucosa.