decimal point

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decimal point

a full stop or a raised full stop placed between the integral and fractional parts of a number in the decimal system

decimal point

[′des·məl ‚pȯint]
(mathematics)
A dot written either on or slightly above the line; used to mark the point at which place values change from positive to negative powers of 10 in the decimal number system.

decimal point

(character)
"." ASCII character 46. Common names are: point; dot; ITU-T, USA: period; ITU-T: decimal point. Rare: radix point; UK: full stop; INTERCAL: spot.
References in periodicals archive ?
Q = distance between grooves in the Z axis, note the value is given without a decimal point.
Always using a leading zero before a decimal point and never using a trailing zero after a decimal point.
The unusual thing to remember when using a G75 grooving routine is the three defined values that must be written without decimal points.
Second-place winners were the Leominster Public Library's Dewey & the Decimal Points, sponsored by the Ronald Ansin Foundation.
A comma before the decimal point indicates that you want to show a thousands separator.
One of the exam boards said last year on one of the maths exams that a lot of decimal points weren't picked up by the computer scanners," he stated.
The additional decimal point means that there is no price rounding which is a hidden cost to spread betters.
When Labour left power after having 13 years to do something about this scandal, the percentage was only a few decimal points below the number it now stands at.
1 percent in April and February, the June rate was the highest when extended to two decimal points (5.
Line up the decimal points and solve the problem as you would any other number.
Obviously misplaced decimal points will be corrected.
We are shaving off our forecast for global growth by a few decimal points," said Hoe Ee Khor, assistant director of the IMF's Asia and Pacific Department, in a conference call on South Korea's economy.