deck

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deck

1. Nautical any of various platforms built into a vessel
2. 
a. the horizontal platform that supports the turntable and pick-up of a record player
b. See tape deck
3. Chiefly US a pack of playing cards
4. Computing, obsolete a collection of punched cards relevant to a particular program
5. a raised wooden platform built in a garden to provide a seating area

Deck

Substrate over which roofing is applied. Usually plywood, wood boards, or planks.

Deck

 

a horizontal covering in the hull of a vessel, extending along the vessel’s entire length. Unlike a deck, a covering located over part of the length or width of a vessel is known as a platform. A ship’s hull may have one deck or several decks and platforms. The deck consists of plating, which consists, in turn, of deck plating proper and a deck stringer along the line where the deck joins the side of the ship, and the framing (beams, carlings, and so forth).

The upper deck provides the basic longitudinal bracing for the ship’s hull, giving the hull overall strength and lateral stiffness. The deck atop the watertight bulkheads is known as the main deck. The height of the main deck over the waterline is the measure of the vessel’s freeboard. The main deck may be the upper deck or, on ships with shelter decks or with continuous superstructures, it may be the second deck from the top. The upper deck accommodates cargo-handling gear on cargo vessels, staterooms on passenger ships, and armament on warships.

Lower decks are used on cargo vessels for dividing cargo space by height and for stowage of cargo. On passenger ships, the lower decks are used for staterooms, common rooms, and auxiliary spaces, and on commercial fish-processing vessels they contain processing equipment. The space between the upper and lower decks is called the tween deck, and the space below the lowest deck is called the hold. The openings in the upper deck (hatches) are framed with coamings and equipped with watertight covers. Decks over the superstructure are called supersructure decks. Partial decks over the main deck are distinguished by function; examples include boat decks and promenade decks. Deck thickness and deck framing dimensions for civilian vessels are regulated by the classification societies.

E. G. LOGVINOVICH

deck

[dek]
(computer science)
A set of punched cards.
(civil engineering)
A floor, usually of wood, without a roof.
The floor or roadway of a bridge.
(engineering)
A magnetic-tape transport mechanism.
(naval architecture)
Horizontal or cambered and sloping surfaces on a ship, corresponding to the floors of a building.

deck

1. The flooring of a building or other structure.
2. A flat open platform, as on a roof.
3. The structural surface to which a roof covering system is applied.
4. The top section of a mansard or curb roof when it is nearly flat.

deck

(1) The part of a magnetic tape unit that holds and moves the tape reels. The term may refer to any equipment that serves as a physical framework for electronic or mechanical devices. See rack. See also DEC.

(2) A component that is designed to provide a media source for an audio or video system. Decks do not have built-in amplification and speakers or a screen for display. Typical decks are VCRs and CD and DVD players or changers, which are often mounted in a stereo or home theater rack. When installed in a computer, CD-ROM and DVD players are called "drives" rather than decks. See rack.
References in classic literature ?
Then I am going to see if my books and papers are ready, so I can get them together in a hurry in case we have to take to the life-boats," said Professor Bumper, coming on deck at that moment.
When there seemed to be nothing for him to do, he would climb to a nook among the cotton-bales of the upper deck, and busy himself in studying over his Bible,--and it is there we see him now.
Surrounded by the rosy light, and standing high upon the deck, apart together, she clinging to him, and he holding her, they solemnly passed away.
This had received the brunt of our fire and seemed to be entirely unmanned, as not a moving figure was visible upon her decks.
Ned Land took his handkerchief to wave in the air; but he had scarcely displayed it, when he was struck down by an iron hand, and fell, in spite of his great strength, upon the deck.
Then with a violent thud, a blinding flash, her decks, her funnels, leaped upward.
And then the indulgence with which he treats her, the finery in which he decks her out, the state in which she moves, the sway she enjoys over both his purse and person; instead of being the drudge and slave of an Indian husband, obliged to carry his pack, and build his lodge, and make his fire, and bear his cross humors and dry blows.
A lashed boat, a spare spar, a cask or what not secured about the decks, is "cast adrift" when it is untied.
Being destitute of weapons, they let themselves down by the running rigging, in hopes of getting between decks.
Upon the decks of the sullen ships of war black-bearded yellow men looked over eagerly toward the south.
Having reached the decision to board the steamer, she now looked to it for aid, but to her surprise the decks appeared to be empty and she saw no sign of life aboard the ship.
But wilder yet was the cry, and shriller still the scream, when there rose up from the shadow of those silent bulwarks the long lines of the English bowmen, and the arrows whizzed in a deadly sleet among the unprepared masses upon the pirate decks.