Déclassé

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Déclassé

 

a person who has forfeited his ties with his social class and its interests but who has not joined another social class.

References in periodicals archive ?
always a little slow, finally gets what was, again and again, the central point being made by the comedy of The Sopranos, namely that the old honor culture--both the unofficial one of the mafia and the official one of the armed forces--has become declasse.
during the war on the grounds that it was the most declasse branch of the services and had ugly uniforms.
Orton does not mince words as he explains, "These covenants were based upon the desire of some social-climbing, self-appointed snobs to set themselves above regular folks by making the use of outdoor clotheslines declasse just because they could afford an electric clothes dryer.
But in mid-twentieth century America, comic books were declasse.
Most bartenders hate everything about blender drinks, and most drinks served with an umbrella garnish are considered way too declasse even to mention in today's cutting edge cocktail joints.
Here is what they offer as proof: "Twenty years ago, being pro-life was declasse.
A quick hello and handshake - any fawning would be strictly declasse.
The odd thing is that for decades, Yountville was deemed declasse by the rest of the Napa Valley.
This ambivalence corresponds to the case of a city like Liverpool, which went from negligible to all-but global without a midway of provincial; yet now finds itself strangely declasse, surrounded with monumental evidence of a distinctly local identity which, paradoxically, entrained a global scope that seems now beyond its reach.
Grey hair is declasse amongst retired army officers.
Certainly, the footage of malnourished children, missile launches, and goose-stepping soldiers, alongside declasse dictator fashion quickly leads one to assume that the system is bizarre, the leader is loopy, and the entire North Korean situation is basically beyond our comprehension.
Previously, evangelicalism had been a working-class and middle-class phenomenon; many in the upper class regarded converts as declasse, puritanical whackos.