output

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output

1. Electronics
a. the power, voltage, or current delivered by a circuit or component
b. the point at which the signal is delivered
2. the power, energy, or work produced by an engine or a system
3. Computing
a. the information produced by a computer
b. the operations and devices involved in producing this information

output

[′au̇t‚pu̇t]
(computer science)
The data produced by a data-processing operation, or the information that is the objective or goal in data processing.
The data actively transmitted from within the computer to an external device, or onto a permanent recording medium (paper, microfilm).
The activity of transmitting the generated information.
The readable storage medium upon which generated data are written, as in hard-copy output.
(electronics)
The current, voltage, power, driving force, or information which a circuit or device delivers.
Terminals or other places where a circuit or device can deliver current, voltage, power, driving force, or information.
(science and technology)
The product of a system.

output

(architecture)
Data transferred from a computer system to the outside world via some kind of output device.

Opposite: input.

output

(1) Any computer-generated information displayed on screen, printed on paper or in machine readable form, such as disk and tape.

(2) To transfer or transmit from the computer to a peripheral device or communications line.
References in periodicals archive ?
The same AVP infusion, when given to septic sheep, decreased cardiac output (CO) as well as mesenteric blood flow through significant mesenteric vasoconstriction.
Other serious adverse events reported in the Phase 3 clinical trial of Fabrazyme included stroke, pain, ataxia, bradychardia, cardiac arrhthymia, cardiac arrest, decreased cardiac output, vertigo, hypocousia, and nephrotic syndrome.
5-7) It has also been observed that patients with chronic obstructive lung disease are at increased risk for cough syncope, since they have prolonged expiratory phases, increased airways resistance, and increased expiratory strength, all of which predispose them to elevated intrathoracic pressures and decreased cardiac output.
Therapies that reverse compromised kidney function in patients with decreased cardiac output address a critical unmet medical need.