dedifferentiation

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Related to dedifferentiate: redifferentiation

dedifferentiation

[dē‚dif·ə‚ren·chē′ā·shən]
(biology)
Disintegration of a specialized habit or adaptation.
(cell and molecular biology)
Loss of recognizable specializations that define a differentiated cell.
(physiology)
Return of a specialized cell or structure to a more general or primitive condition.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was previously postulated (Pandey, 1973) that the young microspore has four possible kinds of potencies: to develop normally into a male gametophyte, to develop into a female gametophyte (giant embryo sac-like pollen grains from certain species, see Pandey, 1973 for a review), to develop into a sporophyte (embryo), and to dedifferentiate into a callus.
It is possible, however, for these tumors to dedifferentiate further into a more aggressive form, with the possibility of metastasis.
Then, selective inhibition of the excessive proliferation of VSMC is considered to have the potential to protect from vascular disorders as well as dedifferentiate VSMC from the synthetic to the contractile state and induce apoptosis.
Spinal Cord Society (Fergus Falls, MN) has patented a process for generating multipotent cells from glial cells using in vitro techniques to dedifferentiate fetal or adult mammalian glial cells into multipotent cells.
After injury, mature kidney cells dedifferentiate into more primordial versions of themselves, and then differentiate into the cell types needing replacement in the damaged tissue.
During gut regeneration, the specialized epithelial cells dedifferentiate, re-enter the cell cycle, and migrate either as an epithelial sheet or as single cells.
The most significant seems to be that the worms do not dedifferentiate cells to create the blastema.
Simultaneously with migration and proliferation, the cells of the stomach lining continue to dedifferentiate.
Reprogramming an adult cell to dedifferentiate it back into pluripotent stem cells is a key proposal (Option 4) in the 2005 President's Council on Bioethics white paper Alternative Sources of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.
The researchers say the next steps include testing the process on human muscle tissue and screening for other molecular compounds that could help dedifferentiate mature tissue.