deed


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Related to deed: deed of trust, mortgage deed, title deed

deed,

in law, written document that is signed and delivered by which one person conveys land or other realty (see propertyproperty,
rights to the enjoyment of things of economic value, whether the enjoyment is exclusive or shared, present or prospective. The rightful possession of such rights is called ownership.
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) to another. A deed may assure the extent of the conveying party's ownership or, if the party is uncertain of the precise extent, he issues a quitclaim (i.e., a sale), without description, of whatever he may own. The formalities with which a deed is invested are designed to make the instrument conclusive evidence of the transaction described and to eliminate the need for further proof. In all states of the United States deeds must be formally delivered and their receipt formally attested. It is possible to deposit a deed with a third party or a court for delivery to the purchaser; this is termed a delivery in escrow. Most states also require that deeds be acknowledged by a duly authorized commissioner and that a copy be deposited with the clerk of the county where the realty is situated. If the formalities are not observed, a deed (or the contract purporting to convey realty) is some, but not conclusive, evidence of the conveyance.

deed

Any duly attested, written document executed under seal and delivered to effect a transfer, bond, or contract, such as a conveyance of real property or interest therein.

deed

Law a formal legal document signed, witnessed, and delivered to effect a conveyance or transfer of property or to create a legal obligation or contract
References in classic literature ?
So here dwelt Thistle, and many kind friends gathered round him, for he spoke gently to them, and they knew nothing of the cruel deeds he had done; and for a while he was happy and content.
You cannot dwell on the earth without harming the fair things given you to enjoy, so you shall live alone in solitude and darkness, till you have learned to find happiness in gentle deeds, and forget yourself in giving joy to others.
No advantage can be reaped from this deed, whatever it is, save by the girl herself, or her husband; and the possession of this deed by one or other of them is indispensable to any advantage being gained.
Evermore did he now see himself as the doer of one deed.
There is another madness besides, and it is BEFORE the deed.
And this is my own opinion; for, where he could and should give freedom to his pen in praise of so worthy a knight, he seems to me deliberately to pass it over in silence; which is ill done and worse contrived, for it is the business and duty of historians to be exact, truthful, and wholly free from passion, and neither interest nor fear, hatred nor love, should make them swerve from the path of truth, whose mother is history, rival of time, storehouse of deeds, witness for the past, example and counsel for the present, and warning for the future.
Regarding his procession of memory he felt gleeful and unregretting, for in it his public deeds were paraded in great and shining prominence.
It clung near him always and darkened his view of these deeds in purple and gold.
Our deeds determine us, as much as we determine our deeds, and until we know what has been or will be the peculiar combination of outward with inward facts, which constitutes a man's critical actions, it will be better not to think ourselves wise about his character.
For commonwealths, and good governments, do nourish virtue grown but do not much mend the deeds.
Dread is she, and with Ares she loves deeds of war, the sack of cities and the shouting and the battle.
Lift it out, Tom; but I'll just lift up these deeds,--they're the deeds o' the house and mill, I suppose,--and see what there is under 'em.