deep


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to deep: DEAP

deep

1. Cricket relatively far from the pitch
2. (of a colour) having an intense or dark hue
3. any deep place on land or under water, esp below 6000 metres (3000 fathoms)
4. the deep
a. Cricket the area of the field relatively far from the pitch
5. Nautical one of the intervals on a sounding lead, one fathom apart

What does it mean when you dream about depth?

Any sense of depth, particularly going down, in a dream usually represents the unconscious mind. This can be accompanied by feelings of discovery or dread. “Deep” is also found in a number of interesting idioms, such as at the “deep end” or in “deep water.” One can be deeply hurt or deeply troubled.

deep

[dēp]
(oceanography)
An area of great depth in the ocean, representing a depression in the ocean floor.
References in classic literature ?
He drooped and fell away from himself for a moment; then lifting his face to them again, showed a deep joy in his eyes, as he cried out with a heavenly enthusiasm, -- but oh
Which when BEELZEBUB perceiv'd, then whom, SATAN except, none higher sat, with grave Aspect he rose, and in his rising seem'd A Pillar of State; deep on his Front engraven Deliberation sat and publick care; And Princely counsel in his face yet shon, Majestick though in ruin: sage he stood With ATLANTEAN shoulders fit to bear The weight of mightiest Monarchies; his look Drew audience and attention still as Night Or Summers Noon-tide air, while thus he spake.
Their religion is not a mere superstitious fear, like that of most savages; they evince abstract notions of morality; a deep reverence for an overruling spirit, and a respect for the rights of their fellow men.
The country was destitute of trees, and though there might be drift-wood along the river, it lay too deep beneath the snow for them to find it.
Aylmer appeared to believe that, by the plainest scientific logic, it was altogether within the limits of possibility to discover this long-sought medium; "but," he added, "a philosopher who should go deep enough to acquire the power would attain too lofty a wisdom to stoop to the exercise of it.
The little river which turned sharply in its course, and was thus immediately lost to sight, seemed to have no exit from its prison, but to be absorbed by the deep green foliage of the trees to the east -- while in the opposite quarter (so it appeared to me as I lay at length and glanced upward) there poured down noiselessly and continuously into the valley, a rich golden and crimson waterfall from the sunset fountains of the sky.
The princess looked into the spring after her ball, but it was very deep, so deep that she could not see the bottom of it.
A moment he let his fingers sink deep into the cold flesh, and then, realizing that she was already dead, he turned from her, to examine the contents of the room; nor did he again molest the body of either Lady Alice or Sir John.
His thin, worn, sallow face was covered with deep wrinkles, which always looked as clean and well washed as the tips of one's fingers after a Russian bath.
This time he did not dismount, but led the way to the deep canon where the stream had cut a passage among the knolls.
Down in the bottom of a deep locker he found a dozen bottles of angelica and muscatel.
248-249) `Demophoon, my son, the strange woman buries you deep in fire and works grief and bitter sorrow for me.