sedation

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Related to deep sedation: Moderate Sedation, minimal sedation, Conscious sedation

sedation

1. a state of calm or reduced nervous activity
2. the administration of a sedative

sedation

[si′dā·shən]
(medicine)
A state of lessened activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Incidence of Deep Sedation and Respiratory Compromise During Procedural Sedation" Proceedings of the International Anesthesia Research Society, May 7, 2013.
Advisory on granting privileges for deep sedation to non-anesthesiologist sedation practitioners.
The ASA guidelines warn that the presence of one or more sedation-related risk factors, coupled with the potential for deep sedation, may increase the likelihood of adverse events.
Complex procedures or procedures in high-risk patients "may justify the use of an anesthesiologist/anesthetist to provide conscious and/or deep sedation," the statement said.
Likewise, patients undergoing procedures under moderate to deep sedation have a similar potential for adverse respiratory events.
Autonomic dysfunction in severe tetanus: magnesium sulfate as an adjunct to deep sedation.
The rapid opiate detoxification treatment is carried out in a full-service hospital in Southern California by board-certified anesthesiologists while patients remain under deep sedation, so they experience minimal conscious withdrawal or suffering.
Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) Target RASS RASS description +4 Combative, violent, danger to staff +3 Pulls or removes tube(s) or catheters, aggressive +2 Frequent non-purposeful movement, fights ventilator +1 Anxious, apprehensive, but not aggressive 0 Alert and calm -1 Awakens to voice (eye opening/contact) >10 s -2 Light sedation, briefly awakens to voice (eye opening/contact) <10 s -3 Moderate sedation, movement or eye opening, no eye contact -4 Deep sedation, no response to voice, but movement or eye opening to physical stimulation -5 Not arousable, no response to voice or physical stimulation
The monitors could be used as part of an integrated approach for the evaluation of those patients especially when the subjective scales do not work well in the setting of neuromuscular blockade or may not be sufficiently sensitive to evaluate very deep sedation.
The rapid opiate detoxification procedure is carried out in a full-service hospital in Southern California by board-certified anesthesiologists while patients remain under deep sedation, so they experience minimal conscious withdrawal or suffering.