defect

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defect

Crystallog a local deviation from regularity in the crystal lattice of a solid

Defect

In lumber, an irregularity occurring in or on wood that will tend to impair its strength, durability, or utility value.

defect

[′dē‚fekt]
(science and technology)
An irregularity that spoils the appearance or impairs the usefulness or effectiveness of an object or a material by causing weakness or failure.

defect

In wood, a fault that may reduce its durability, usefulness, or strength.

defect

References in periodicals archive ?
He informed that under Article 63-A2 of the constitution of Pakistan the membership of members of National and Provincial assemblies also becomes void if the member is declared defection.
The general's defections is said to have been coordinated by Tut Kew, an advisor to President Salva Kiir and Unity state governor, Joseph Monytuel.
There were also reports that Cameron launched an extraordinary attack on Mark Reckless, whose defection to UKIP was announced on Saturday.
The defection of Mr Reckless has angered Conservatives far more than that of Douglas Carswell.
Spokesperson Zabihullah Mujahid said that Hai's defection is a big achievement for the mujahideen.
The AP discovered a memo, prominently marked "SECRET," among the dossier that predicted her defection would have a "profound effect" on those seeking to escape unsatisfactory conditions in Soviet bloc countries.
He added: "Ironically, most of the people he was talking to about Maclean and Burgess' defection were, in fact, people who would go on to defect.
The rare defections -- involving one officer who shot dead two superiors before defecting on Saturday -- prompted the North to launch special probes on soldiers stationed at the border, Yonhap news agency and other media said.
The Syrian regime has recently been shaken by defections of Prime Minister Riad Hijab , a faithful old regime, and General Manaf Tlass, the highest ranking Syrian dissident who was a childhood friend of President Bashar Al-Assad.
Aboud had helped secure the defection earlier this week of former Syrian prime minister Riad Hijab and his safe escape to Jordan.
Just hours before word of the defection got out, Assad suffered another blow in his attempt to portray he is in control when a bomb ripped through the third floor of the state TV building in Damascus, wounding at least three employees and displaying the ability of rebels to strike in the heart of the capital.
This is the question that everyone is now raising as the movement of defection has become a quasi daily phenomenon and extends from diplomats to military men and politicians.