defibrillation

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defibrillation

[dē‚fib·rə′lā·shən]
(medicine)
Stopping a local quivering of muscle fibers, especially of the heart.
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead of repositioning, the physician tested again and defibrillated successfully with 23 J.
Newspaper was defibrillated in a mechanical blender by a process described by D.
No, it can't do that because the defragmentory flange sprocket that was erroneously installed in 1832 has just defibrillated itself and I've thus just instigated a permanent fatal error.
Ann Sawyer, the voluntary group's training manager in Warwickshire, says: "Thousands of people die from cardiac arrests in the UK each year and the majority might be saved if only their heart could be defibrillated within five minutes.
The machines themselves are simple to use, informing staff if an individual needs to be defibrillated, and giving directions about its use.
Imagine yourself confronted with someone who needs to be intubated, who needs an IV line, who needs to be defibrillated all at once and get on the radio, alert the hospital, get orders, and all this at the same time controlling a crowd, perhaps.
The American Heart Association estimates that as many as 100,000 more lives might be saved yearly if cardiac-arrest victims were defibrillated within five to seven minutes.
The quicker they can be defibrillated the greater the chances of survival.
Effective CPR can help make the difference between life and death, buying valuable time and increasing the likelihood that the victim can successfully be defibrillated by an electric shock.
Death often occurs because of an irregular heart beat which can be corrected by defibrillation but only a few casualties who are defibrillated after eight minutes - the target response time for an ambulance to reach a 999 emergency - survive.
Last month, a 70-year-old passenger aboard another Chicago-bound plane was successfully defibrillated by an American flight attendant while the plane was waiting to take off from North Carolina's Raleigh-Durham airport.
Studies show that cardiac-arrest victims defibrillated within the first 3 to 5 minutes have a 70 percent chance of survival.