definite


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definite

Botany
a. denoting a type of growth in which the main stem ends in a flower, as in a cymose inflorescence; determinate
b. (esp of flower parts) limited or fixed in number in a given species
References in classic literature ?
A man may contend that 'much' is the contrary of 'little', or 'great' of 'small', but of definite quantitative terms no contrary exists.
I fear that unless you can give me some more definite information than this it would be impossible to get him to move.
The Rostovs supposed that The Russian Guards, Abroad, was quite a definite address, and that if a letter reached the Grand Duke in command of the Guards there was no reason why it should not reach the Pavlograd regiment, which was presumably somewhere in the same neighborhood.
Led by the new light that had fallen on her, Emily returned to the library the next morning with a definite idea of what she had to look for.
I undertake to reconsider my first refusal, and to give him a definite answer when we meet the next morning at breakfast.
The new doctor declined to give any definite opinion on the case until he had studied it carefully with plenty of time at his disposal.
There is little definite material for an answer to this question, but the probability is that there were at least three contributory causes.
In any work of literature there should be definite structure.
My energy was directed towards no definite aims; I wished for the flowers of life without the toil of cultivating them.
We haven't heard anything about the line from Ipswich to Norwich, sir," he replied, "but we can't very well change our course without definite instructions.
Of course, "knowledge" is too definite a word: the states of mind concerned are grouped together as "cognitive," and are to embrace not only beliefs, but perceptions, doubts, and the understanding of concepts.
In her family's eyes he had no ordinary, definite career and position in society, while his contemporaries by this time, when he was thirty-two, were already, one a colonel, and another a professor, another director of a bank and railways, or president of a board like Oblonsky.