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definite

Botany
a. denoting a type of growth in which the main stem ends in a flower, as in a cymose inflorescence; determinate
b. (esp of flower parts) limited or fixed in number in a given species
References in periodicals archive ?
Without this contrast, the use of a definite article would also be perfectly possible in Hungarian.
Consider, for contrast, the shortened versions of those same statements with the definite article omitted: "Jews killed Jesus," "Jews control Hollywood," "In 1939, after the Russians entered [Jedwabne], Jews took over all the offices, including the town hall.
There is no fully grammaticalized definite article in Chinese.
de Wolf (1991: 93-94) does not offer an explicit gloss of the morpheme, but in his translations it appears consistently as the equivalent of a numeral with a definite article in Spanish, as one can see in example (4):
In every example of the enumeration of a full sequence of consecutive days within a week or a month in the Pentateuch, the pattern of using the definite article with the ordinal numeral is always followed.
Indeed, in Tuscan the definite article is always used with kinship terms, as shown in 2.
The reason for selecting these language groups is because each language is typologically very different: Spanish has definite and indefinite articles, and uses the definite article for plural and mass nouns in subject and object positions; Turkish only has an indefinite article; Japanese has no articles.
In Spanish, all nouns preceded by the definite article 'la' or by the indefinite article 'una' are feminine, whilst all nouns preceded by the definite article 'el' or by the indefinite article 'un' are masculine.
Meaning it does not require said punctuation - but needs a definite article.
The" is an article, a definite article that indicates that its noun (sniffles) is a particular one identifiable to the listener.
7) There are languages that have the definite article and lack the indefinite article; for instance, Icelandic.
Both confirmed that a/al is a definite article (much like the Hebrew ha-), essentially meaning "the," and that in English el and al are interchangeable ("al" is French-inflected).