degauss

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degauss

[dē′gau̇s]
(electronics)
To remove, erase, or clear information from a magnetic tape, disk, drum, or core.
(electromagnetism)
To neutralize (demagnetize) a magnetic field of, for example, a ship hull or television tube; a direct current of the correct value is sent through a cable around the ship hull; a current-carrying coil is brought up to and then removed from the television tube. Also known as deperm.

degauss

To remove unwanted magnetism from a monitor or the read/write head in a disk or tape drive. Some monitors have a built-in degaussing function that can be activated by the user. See gauss and bulk eraser.
References in periodicals archive ?
By incorporating the Fujitsu Mag EraSURE degausser into our data eradication services, we can guarantee our customers' sensitive data is completely erased and cannot be recovered by hackers or otherwise exploited,' said Chris Schoeller, vice president of sales, data security and compliance with QSGI.
QSGI services customers across a wide variety of industries-including banking and financial services, government, retail, manufacturing and healthcare-and the Fujitsu Mag EraSURE degausser facilitates reliable disposal of sensitive information.
Fujitsu continues to support service providers like QSGI by offering Mag EraSURE degausser, the most robust secure data disposal solution available today.
The strength of type I degaussers can be expected to have little erasure power over the metal-particle tapes and even some erase heads provided by the recorder manufacturers seem to be inadequate for re-recording.
and their erasure by type I degaussers is a common practice.
Approved bulk degaussers are readily available for many magnetic tape applications.
When sensitive information is stored on the media, it may be controlled by secure storage, or by effective erasure by a degausser approved for the type of media.
But they do not have data destruction in mind; manufacturers tend to rate degaussers by whether they erase sufficiently for clean rerecording, not by whether they make erased information impractical to retrieve.
Nor does the federal government provide much guidance on degaussers.
Generating much more coercivity than recording heads (used for overwriting), the highest rated AC degaussers available generate about 4,000 Oe.
A potential purchaser must also consider that large degaussers generate intense magnetic fields and, consequently, considerable heat.