deglaciation


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

deglaciation

[dē‚glās·ē′ā·shən]
(hydrology)
Exposure of an area from beneath a glacier or ice sheet as a result of shrinkage of the ice by melting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Deglaciation of Nova Scotia: Stratigraphy and chronology of lake sediment cores and buried organic sections.
The researchers' analysis of the scope of the ice loss suggests that deglaciation in southern Greenland 400,000 years ago would have accounted for at least four meters - and possibly up to six meters - of global sea level rise.
Palaeoenvironmental information has shown that the south of the Jura massif was encircled by palaeolakes at the end of the deglaciation process (Evin et al.
It needs some push to get over that [threshold], but we don't believe that push has to be very hard to deliver a lot of deglaciation.
Current models suggest the deglaciation of Greenland in response to these rising temper-atures should occur slowly over thousands of years, but the models used do not include recent observed changes in ice dynamics.
Some species, such as dodder (Cuscuta gronovii), field grapefern (Botnychium campestre), and wild columbine (Aquilegia canadensis) may have migrated from the east after deglaciation.
Programme & James Painter, Human Development Report 2007/ 2008: Deglaciation in the Andean Region, 2007/55 (2007).
Glacial Lake Barlow was located within the confines of TG between 9000 and 8000 years before present (BP), during Laurentide Ice Sheet deglaciation (Barnett 1992; Dyke 2004; Cronin et al.
This observation may be result from changes of land mass configurations due to glaciation and deglaciation and the accompanying lowering and rising of sea levels during the late Pleistocene.