degradation product

degradation product

[‚deg·rə′dā·shən ‚präd·əkt]
(petroleum engineering)
In petroleum processing, a contaminant or a low-value product formed during a reaction such as cracking, dehydrogenation, or polymerization.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, even experienced clinical pathologists cannot definitively distinguish a minor degradation product from a small monoclonal protein on an electropherogram.
D-dimer is a degradation product of cross-linked fibrin.
13), in their work on oxidative degradation of PVB, found that over 52% of the degradation product was butyraldehyde.
This led to joint research projects to answer specific questions such as whether PFOS, the major degradation product of many of the company's chemistries, was present in the general environment.
This change correlated well with urine concentrations of collagen type II degradation product, which results from cartilage breakdown (Arthritis Rheum.
Levels of a bone degradation product that signals osteoclast activation and progression of bone metastasis were measured in 27 of the patients; during a 6-month period, the levels decreased by at least 25% in 6 patients and remained stable in 10 patients, indicating a halt in progression.
The methods for two of the chemicals I am most familiar with (aldicarb and methomyl) use gas chromatographic determination of a degradation product of the parent compound.
Exposures of preschool children to chlorpyrifos and its degradation product 3,5,8-trichloro-2-pyridinol in their everyday environments.
First, with the use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, whether PLP traps 3-deoxyglucosone (3DG), a major glucose degradation product in PD, was determined.
This study suggests the potential usefulness of a novel urinary marker of bone resorption, HelP, a degradation product of the helicoidal region of type 1 collagen.
It is not enough to know that the degradation product is a natural metabolite, as most natural metabolites take part in various events, e.
In similar experiments using 20 rats with jaundice -- caused by a toxic buildup of bilirubin (a brain-damaging, yellow degradation product of hemoglobin) -- a bead-bound fungal enzyme harmlessly broke down all of the bilirubin in filtered blood.