degras


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degras

[dā′gräs]
(materials)
A semioxidized fat obtained from sheep skins by subjecting them to the action of oxidized fish oil and pressing them; used to dress leather. Also known as moellen.
A mixture of this material with other fatty oils or fats or with wool grease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Extracts from the Theses of the Tenth ecci Plenum on the Economic Struggle and the Tasks of Communist Parties," in Degras, ed.
Nombre de acusada: Ma Dana Martinez o Maria Mendez Degras
As Priska Degras argues, "Traversee de la mangrove is as much an exploration of the painful opacity of individual and collective stories as a luminous demonstration of the multiple possibilities offered by novel writing.
History of Monetary and Credit Theory from John Law to the Present Day, 1938, translated by Jane Degras, 1940, reprinted, New York: Augustus M.
Jeremy Degras, executive chef, Chez Charles: French food has long been a popular choice among all nationalities.
Theses on the national and colonial question adopted by the second Comintern congress, 28 July 1920', in Jane Degras (ed), The Communist International 1919-1943.
39) Lozovsky, Tenth ECCI Plenum speech, in Jane Degras, ed.
Compare "Extracts from a circular letter on Factory Cells of the Organization Department of the ECCI," December 1930, in Degras, ed.
Our glass of wine apiece (excellent Chilean Degras merlot and NZ Giesen sauvignon blanc) and my espresso took the bill to pounds 57.
Dubai-based Chez Charles has appointed two chefs, Sylvain Gohier and Jeremy Degras, to coincide with the launch of its new website and catering service.
Weltkongresses der Kommunistischen Internationale, Hamburg, 1924, p19 (English version: 'Extracts from the Theses on Tactics adopted by the Fifth Comintern Congress, July 1924', in Jane Degras, ed.
For the twenty-one conditions, see Jane Degras (ed.