degree


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degree

1. a stage in a scale of relative amount or intensity
2. an academic award conferred by a university or college on successful completion of a course or as an honorary distinction (honorary degree)
3. Med any of three categories of seriousness of a burn
4. (in the US) any of the categories into which a crime is divided according to its seriousness
5. Music any note of a diatonic scale relative to the other notes in that scale
6. a unit of temperature on a specified scale
7. Geometry a measure of angle equal to one three-hundred-and-sixtieth of the angle traced by one complete revolution of a line about one of its ends.
8. Geography
a. a unit of latitude or longitude, divided into 60 minutes, used to define points on the earth's surface or on the celestial sphere
b. a point or line defined by units of latitude and/or longitude.
9. a unit on any of several scales of measurement, as for alcohol content or specific gravity.
10. Maths
a. the highest power or the sum of the powers of any term in a polynomial or by itself
b. the greatest power of the highest order derivative in a differential equation
11. degrees of frost See frost

Degree

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

A degree is 1/360 of the circumference of a circle. The number 360 may come from older notions about the year being 360 days in length.

Degree

 

in music, any of the tones or notes in a scale or tuning system. European music of the 17th through the 19th century was based on a system of 12 degrees, in which major and minor diatonic scales predominated; chromatic scales, however, were also used. The 12 degrees were divided into two groups: seven degrees corresponding in C major to the white keys on the piano and five degrees corresponding to the black keys. In 20th-century music all 12 degrees are frequently used without such division, yielding a chromatic scale. Other systems include the pentatonic scale, with five degrees, and microtonal scales with 24 or 36 degrees.

degree

[di′grē]
(chemistry)
Any one of several units for measuring hardness of water, such as the English or Clark degree, the French degree, and the German degree.
(fluid mechanics)
One of the units in any of various scales of specific gravity, such as the Baumé scale.
(mathematics)
A unit for measurement of plane angles, equal to 1/360 of a complete revolution, or 1/90 of a right angle. Symbolized °.
For a term in one variable, the exponent of that variable.
For a term in several variables, the sum of the exponents of its variables.
For a polynomial, the degree of the highest-degree term.
For a differential equation, the greatest power to which the highest-order derivative occurs.
For an algebraic curve defined by the polynomial equation ƒ(x,y) = 0, the degree of the polynomial ƒ(x,y).
For a vertex in a graph, the number of arcs which have that vertex as an end point.
For an extension of a field, the dimension of the extension field as a vector space over the original field.
(thermodynamics)
One of the units of temperature or temperature difference in any of various temperature scales, such as the Celsius, Fahrenheit, and Kelvin temperature scales (the Kelvin degree is now known as the kelvin).

degree

1. A step, as of a stair.
2. A stair, or set of steps.

degree

The degree (or valency) of a node in a graph is the number of edges joined to it.
References in classic literature ?
1851, with Overweg, to visit the kingdom of Adamaoua, to the south of the lake, and from there he pushed on as far as the town of Yola, a little below nine degrees north latitude.
He returned in the month of August to Kouka; from there he successively traversed the Mandara, Barghimi, and Klanem countries, and reached his extreme limit in the east, the town of Masena, situated at seventeen degrees twenty minutes west longitude.
A few more degrees and I felt that I should lose consciousness.
Yes, I'm thinking of it," I answered; "but what difference will it make when our air supply is exhausted whether the temperature is 153 degrees or 153,000?
It would in some measure relieve my embarrassment if I could, even in a slight degree, feel myself worthy of the great honour which you do me to-day.
As this was the first time that a New England university had conferred an honorary degree upon a Negro, it was the occasion of much newspaper comment throughout the country.
Now this conversation in our historian must be universal, that is, with all ranks and degrees of men; for the knowledge of what is called high life will not instruct him in low; nor,
From the protection of different and unequal faculties of acquiring property, the possession of different degrees and kinds of property immediately results; and from the influence of these on the sentiments and views of the respective proprietors, ensues a division of the society into different interests and parties.
The latent causes of faction are thus sown in the nature of man; and we see them everywhere brought into different degrees of activity, according to the different circumstances of civil society.
And thus it was not for the sake of painted tulips, but for real ones, that Van Baerle took from him half a degree of warmth.
It is only in those cases in which the modification has been comparatively recent and extraordinarily great that we ought to find the generative variability, as it may be called, still present in a high degree.
From 67@ 30' to 90@, twenty-two degrees and a half of latitude remained to travel; that is, about five hundred leagues.