degree


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Related to degree: degree of a polynomial, academic degree, Degree of comparison, Degree courses

degree

1. a stage in a scale of relative amount or intensity
2. an academic award conferred by a university or college on successful completion of a course or as an honorary distinction (honorary degree)
3. Med any of three categories of seriousness of a burn
4. (in the US) any of the categories into which a crime is divided according to its seriousness
5. Music any note of a diatonic scale relative to the other notes in that scale
6. a unit of temperature on a specified scale
7. Geometry a measure of angle equal to one three-hundred-and-sixtieth of the angle traced by one complete revolution of a line about one of its ends.
8. Geography
a. a unit of latitude or longitude, divided into 60 minutes, used to define points on the earth's surface or on the celestial sphere
b. a point or line defined by units of latitude and/or longitude.
9. a unit on any of several scales of measurement, as for alcohol content or specific gravity.
10. Maths
a. the highest power or the sum of the powers of any term in a polynomial or by itself
b. the greatest power of the highest order derivative in a differential equation
11. degrees of frost See frost

Degree

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

A degree is 1/360 of the circumference of a circle. The number 360 may come from older notions about the year being 360 days in length.

Degree

 

in music, any of the tones or notes in a scale or tuning system. European music of the 17th through the 19th century was based on a system of 12 degrees, in which major and minor diatonic scales predominated; chromatic scales, however, were also used. The 12 degrees were divided into two groups: seven degrees corresponding in C major to the white keys on the piano and five degrees corresponding to the black keys. In 20th-century music all 12 degrees are frequently used without such division, yielding a chromatic scale. Other systems include the pentatonic scale, with five degrees, and microtonal scales with 24 or 36 degrees.

degree

[di′grē]
(chemistry)
Any one of several units for measuring hardness of water, such as the English or Clark degree, the French degree, and the German degree.
(fluid mechanics)
One of the units in any of various scales of specific gravity, such as the Baumé scale.
(mathematics)
A unit for measurement of plane angles, equal to 1/360 of a complete revolution, or 1/90 of a right angle. Symbolized °.
For a term in one variable, the exponent of that variable.
For a term in several variables, the sum of the exponents of its variables.
For a polynomial, the degree of the highest-degree term.
For a differential equation, the greatest power to which the highest-order derivative occurs.
For an algebraic curve defined by the polynomial equation ƒ(x,y) = 0, the degree of the polynomial ƒ(x,y).
For a vertex in a graph, the number of arcs which have that vertex as an end point.
For an extension of a field, the dimension of the extension field as a vector space over the original field.
(thermodynamics)
One of the units of temperature or temperature difference in any of various temperature scales, such as the Celsius, Fahrenheit, and Kelvin temperature scales (the Kelvin degree is now known as the kelvin).

degree

1. A step, as of a stair.
2. A stair, or set of steps.

degree

The degree (or valency) of a node in a graph is the number of edges joined to it.
References in classic literature ?
Rusty through long idleness, some little space was requisite before my intellectual machinery could be brought to work upon the tale with an effect in any degree satisfactory.
And according to the degree of pleasure and pride we feel in being republicans, ought to be our zeal in cherishing the spirit and supporting the character of Federalists.
Consequently, Nature herself supplies us with an ascending scale or Alphabet of angles for half a degree up to 60 degrees, Specimens of which are placed in every Elementary School throughout the land.
The temperature of the water at the surface showed twelve degrees, it was now only ten; we had gained two.
8 degrees 38" and 9 degrees 32" South latitude and 139 degrees
There be three degrees of this hiding and veiling of a man's self.
Penney--the head of the Egyptian medical service, who, in a small steamer, penetrated one degree beyond Gondokoro, and then came back to die of exhaustion at Karthoum--nor Miani, the Venetian, who, turning the cataracts below Gondokoro, reached the second parallel-- nor the Maltese trader, Andrea Debono, who pushed his journey up the Nile still farther--could work their way beyond the apparently impassable limit.
He listened with some degree of interest to what I had to say, but did not give me anything.
Our conception of the degree of freedom often varies according to differences in the point of view from which we regard the event, but every human action appears to us as a certain combination of freedom and inevitability.
One estimates it thirty miles, because the internal heat, increasing at the rate of about one degree to each sixty to seventy feet depth, would be sufficient to fuse the most refractory substances at that distance beneath the surface.
In the same degree as Cornelius de Witt had excited the hatred of the people by sowing those evil seeds which are called political passions, Van Baerle had gained the affections of his fellow citizens by completely shunning the pursuit of politics, absorbed as he was in the peaceful pursuit of cultivating tulips.
The whole organisation seems to have become plastic, and tends to depart in some small degree from that of the parental type.