deindustrialization

(redirected from deindustrializing)
Also found in: Dictionary, Financial.

deindustrialization

the process in which a previously industrialized or industrializing economy, or society, or region, reverts partly or wholly to a preindustrialized form. This process may occur as the outcome of international economic competition (see DEPENDENCY THEORY, also IMPERIALISM).

To some degree, the process may also occur within developed societies (e.g. the recent regional decline of manufacturing industries such as textiles or shipbuilding in parts of Western Europe). Nor is it simply a recent phenomenon. Rather, it can be seen as a ‘normal’ aspect of the workings of capitalism on an international stage at all phases of its development. According to WALLERSTEIN (1974), societies as different as Poland and India are examples of economies which underwent periods of deindustrialization in the course of the development of the world economy.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Consider this: if factory jobs were really shrinking because imports were deindustrializing America, then manufacturing output as a share of overall U.
the] trade deficit is deindustrializing the United States.
Lewis, Corporate Wasteland: The Landscape and Memory of Deindustrialization (Toronto, 2007); and Stephen High, "Placing the Displaced Worker: Narrating Place in Deindustrializing Sturgeon Falls, Ontario" in Placing Memory and Remembering Place in Canada Edited by James Opp and John C.
Normalizations taking into account differences in the size of territory and climate reduce this gross disparity, but the net difference remains large, particularly considering that the United States has been deindustrializing, whereas energy-intensive manufacturing remains much stronger in Germany and Japan.
While these facts explain the tenor of the 2008 presidential campaign throughout the deindustrializing Midwest, they do not prove that outsourcing and trade are to blame for our manufacturing woes.
Once growth became both the means and end of our deindustrializing economy, and as the quantification of the net effect on growth of various human actions became the closest approximation of passion an economist's heart can muster, it was only a matter of time before profligacy became civic virtue.
In deindustrializing economies, the reduction in blue-collar power has in part been manifested by the declining influence of trade unionism (see Freeman 1993).
River City School District is one the largest districts in a deindustrializing state.
Missing from this analysis, however, are the personalized landscapes that also contribute to the understanding of industrial heritage in deindustrializing cities and small towns.
Industrial and agricultural output is down substantially, capital renewal is not keeping pace with the retirement of old machinery, the nation is deindustrializing, real living standards have plummeted, and investment capital is fleeing the country.
Doing so, moreover, is particularly advantageous, for two reasons: first, it keeps state intervention in demand management at bay, and with it any threat of political radicalism; second, by deindustrializing the third world and forcing it into greater reliance on primary production, it keeps inflationary pressures in the metropolis in check.