delay

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delay

[di′lā]
(communications)
Time required for a signal to pass through a device or a conducting medium.
Time which elapses between the instant at which any designated point of a transmitted wave passes any two designated points of a transmission circuit; such delay is primarily determined by the constants of the circuit.
(industrial engineering)
Interruption of the normal tempo of an operation; may be avoidable or unavoidable.

Delay

 

in automatic control systems, a phenomenon that consists in the fact that when the input signal of a system or device begins to change, the output signal begins to change only after a certain time interval, called the delay time. The component of the delay time determined by the final intrinsic rate of propagation of the signal is called the transport delay. Delay may also be caused by the inertia of the system. In electronic simulation equipment, delay is created artificially in delay circuits, which retard the reproduction of the signal by some predetermined time interval. Such delay is used in the simulation of many technological processes associated with matter transfer or power transmission.

delay

i. As it pertains to air traffic control, delays are incurred when a controller takes any action that prevents an aircraft from proceeding normally to its destination for an interval of 15 minutes or more. This includes actions to delay departing, en route, or arriving aircraft, as well as actions taken at destination airports. See also absolute delay.
ii. In radar operations, the ground distance from a point directly beneath the aircraft to the beginning of the area of a radar scan.
iii. The electronic delay of the start of the time base used to select a particular segment of the total.
References in periodicals archive ?
The different background profiles of anticipators and delayers suggest the presence of two contrasting contexts that influence the transition to first intercourse: Delayers appear to be more invested in deferring intercourse, and may be supported by their ties to parents and church.
Thirteen percent of delayers and 53% of anticipators initiated intercourse within a year of the 1988 survey (not shown), and the difference was statistically significant (p<.
However, being influenced by parents significantly increased the odds of first sex among delayers (2.
Family income increased the likelihood of sexual activity within the year only among delayers (1.
The odds ratios associated with school grades were similar for delayers (0.
By far the largest difference between delayers and anticipators was in the effect of having a mother who gave birth as a teenager.
Given the selective nature of the sample, race had no effect on sexual initiation among either group of youths, but older age increased the likelihood of transition to first sex among both delayers (1.
It explained 20% of the transition among delayers and 36% among anticipators.
Anticipators are also more likely than delayers to attribute their lack of sexual experience to a lack of opportunity.
In contrast, delayers seem to have made a choice to defer intercourse, and they tend to have attitudinal, educational and maternal factors that encourage that deferment.
For preventive and intervention programs to be effective, health educators need to identify delayers and anticipators, and develop programs specific to their needs and to their distinct social, psychological and behavioral contexts.
We found little evidence that parental monitoring, influence of friends, school achievement and church attendance reduce the likelihood of initiating sex among delayers or anticipators.