Delirium

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delirium

a state of excitement and mental confusion, often accompanied by hallucinations, caused by high fever, poisoning, brain injury, etc.

Delirium

 

the totality of ideas and concepts not corresponding to reality, distorting reality, and not lending themselves to correction. Delirium completely takes possession of the consciousness and is characterized by the destruction of logical thinking. It is a symptom of many mental illnesses (for example, schizophrenia and alcoholism).

There are two varieties of delirium. In so-called primary delirium, rational, logical cognition is affected; distorted judgment is consistently reinforced by a series of subjective proofs having their own system. This type of delirium is persistent and has a tendency to be progressive. “Emotional” delirium is characterized by images, primarily day-dreams and fantasies; ideas are fragmentary and inconsistent; and rational and emotional cognition are disturbed. Delirium can be eliminated when the underlying illness is cured.


Delirium

 

clouding of consciousness that generally occurs at the height of an infectious disease and is accompanied by a flood of vivid visual hallucinations, raving, and motor excitation. Delirium provoked by alcohol is called delirium tremens.

delirium

[di′lir·ē·əm]
(medicine)
Severely disordered mental state associated with fever, intoxication, head trauma, and other encephalopathies.

Delirium

An embedding coordinate language for parallel programming, implemented on Sequent Symmetry, Cray, BBN Butterfly.

["Parallel Programming with Coordination Structures", S. Lucco et al, 18th POPL, pp.197-208 (1991)].
References in periodicals archive ?
UCSF anesthesiologist Jacqueline Leung, who heads the Perioperative Medicine Research Group, has found that in patients over age 65, postoperative delirium can occur anywhere between 10 percent and 60 percent of the time, depending on risk factors.
If as long believed delirium were merely a temporary condition, those numbers might be less concerning, but a growing number of studies have shown lasting effects, including ongoing cognitive decline associated with a diminished quality of life and long-term mortality.
Equally noteworthy, long-term cognitive impairment is not just limited to older patients with delirium.
Finally, in a health care system intensely focused on high-value care, delirium is associated with longer hospital stays and higher costs.
Despite evidence of a high delirium prevalence being published for a decade, it is clear that delirium remains an under diagnosed condition.
For an older person vulnerable to delirium an encounter with the inpatient health care system can be perilous.
Clinicians trained in the specialist care of the older person are crucial to preventing the onset of delirium and to ensuring that patients with delirium are identified and treated.
elderly subjects suffering from nocturnal delirium in a darkened room and found that without repeated visualization they would not be able to preserve the orientation of objects (i.
In summary, most studies that have attempted to explain sundowning or nocturnal delirium have tended to fall into one of three groups (psychological, environmental, and physiological) according to the specialty of the author.
The evaluation of sundowning will follow essentially in all details the criterion for the diagnosis of delirium.
Living healthy will boost the immunity and prevent illness from occurring therefore, lessen the risk of delirium.
When delirious, patients become vulnerable, scared and at great risk of injury -- therefore supporting them to get through the delirium phase and back to normal is essential.