Deliverance

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Deliverance

See also Freedom.
Aphesius
epithet of Zeus, meaning ‘releaser.’ [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 292–293]
Bolivar, Simón
(1783–1830) the great liberator of South America. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 325]
Bon’, Brian
freed Ireland from the Danes. [Irish Myth.: Walsh Classical, 61–62]
Brown, John
(1800–1859) abolitionist; attempted to liberate slaves. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 64]
Ehud
freed Israelites from Moabites by murdering king. [O.T.: Judges 3:15]
Emancipation Proclamation
Lincoln’s declaration freeing the slaves (1863). [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 161]
Gideon
with 300 men, saved Israel from Midianites. [O.T.: Judges 6:14, 7:19–21]
Jephthah
routed the Ammonites to save Israelites. [O.T.: Judges 11:32]
Lincoln, Abraham
(1809–1865) 16th U.S. president; the Great Emancipator. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 286–287]
Messiah
expected leader sent by God to exalt Israel. [Judaism: Brewer Dictionary]
Moses
led his people out of bondage. [O.T.: Exodus]
Othniel
freed Israelites from bondage of Cushan-rishathaim. [O.T.: Judges 3:9]
Parsifal
deliverer of Amfortas and the Grail knights. [Ger. Opera: Wagner, Parsifal, Westerman, 250]
Passover
festival commemorating Exodus. [Judaism: Wigoder, 472; O.T.: Exodus 12]
Purim
Jewish festival commemorating salvation from Haman’s destruction. [O.T.: Esther 9:20–28]
References in classic literature ?
but who grudge pains who have their deliverance in view?
One of them, a grave and sensible man, told me he was convinced they were in the wrong; that it was not the part of wise men to give themselves up to their misery, but always to take hold of the helps which reason offered, as well for present support as for future deliverance: he told me that grief was the most senseless, insignificant passion in the world, for that it regarded only things past, which were generally impossible to be recalled or to be remedied, but had no views of things to come, and had no share in anything that looked like deliverance, but rather added to the affliction than proposed a remedy; and upon this he repeated a Spanish proverb, which, though I cannot repeat in the same words that he spoke it in, yet I remember I made it into an English proverb of my own, thus:-
They described, most affectionately, how they were surprised with joy at the return of their friend and companion in misery, who they thought had been devoured by wild beasts of the worst kind--wild men; and yet, how more and more they were surprised with the account he gave them of his errand, and that there was a Christian in any place near, much more one that was able, and had humanity enough, to contribute to their deliverance.