delusion

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Related to delusive: delusory, incrustation

delusion,

false belief based upon a misinterpretation of reality. It is not, like a hallucination, a false sensory perception, or like an illusion, a distorted perception. Delusions vary in intensity, and are not uncommon among substance abusers, particularly those who use amphetamines, cocaine, and hallucinogens. They also occur frequently among individuals who have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's diseaseAlzheimer's disease
, degenerative disease of nerve cells in the cerebral cortex that leads to atrophy of the brain and senile dementia and, ultimately, death. The disease is characterized by abnormal accumulation of plaques and by neurofibrillary tangles (malformed nerve
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, Huntington's diseaseHuntington's disease,
hereditary, acute disturbance of the central nervous system usually beginning in middle age and characterized by involuntary muscular movements and progressive intellectual deterioration; formerly called Huntington's chorea.
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, or schizophreniaschizophrenia
, group of severe mental disorders characterized by reality distortions resulting in unusual thought patterns and behaviors. Because there is often little or no logical relationship between the thoughts and feelings of a person with schizophrenia, the disorder has
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, and during the manic stage of bipolar disorder (see depressiondepression,
in psychiatry, a symptom of mood disorder characterized by intense feelings of loss, sadness, hopelessness, failure, and rejection. The two major types of mood disorder are unipolar disorder, also called major depression, and bipolar disorder, whose sufferers are
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). Some common delusions include persecutory delusions, in which the individual falsely believes that others are plotting against him; delusions of thought broadcasting, where the individual believes his thoughts can be transmitted to others; delusions of thought insertion, in which the individual believes that thoughts are being implanted in his mind; and delusions of grandeur, in which the individual imagines himself an unappreciated person of great importance.

delusion

[di′lüzh·ən]
(psychology)
A conviction based on faulty perceptions, feelings, and thinking.

Delusion

Borkman, John Gabriel
suffers from delusions of power. [Nor. Lit.: John Gabriel Borkman]
Bowles, Sally
night-club entertainer thinks she has the makings of a great film actress. [Br. Lit.: Isherwood Berlin Stories in Drabble, 498]
Clamence, Jean-Baptiste
living with his own good and evil. [Fr. Lit.: The Fall]
Dubois, Blanche
felt she and Mitch were above others. [Am. Lit.: A Streetcar Named Desire]
Jones, Brutus
self-styled island emperor experiences traumatic visions. [Am. Lit.: Emperor Jones]
Lockit, Lucy
steals jailer-father’s keys to free phony husband. [Br. Lit.: The Beggar’s Opera]
Pan, Peter
little boy, refuses to grow up; resides in Never Never Land. [Children’s Lit.: Peter Pan]
opium of the people
Marx’s classic metaphor for religion. [Ger. Hist.: Critique of Hegel’s “Philosophy of Right”]
ostrich
hides head, thinking itself concealed. [Animal Symbolism: Brewer Dictionary, 788]

delusion

Psychiatry a belief held in the face of evidence to the contrary, that is resistant to all reason
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, in the typically Shepardian intertwining of a male character's existential crisis with the playwright's longstanding "preoccupation with the power of delusive representations" (Callens 2007, 172), the first act of criticism is articulated through allusion to those nineteenth-century artists who first shaped the picture of the West with "rugged cowboys, hard-riding bronco busters, fierce Indian warriors and devil-may-care cavalry men" (Watkins 2008, 232), which was later appropriated by television producers and Hollywood filmmakers: Frederic Remington (1861-1909) and Charles Marion Russell (1864-1926).
4) It is the case of manufacturers' strict liability for defective products, in the field of which it is only the consumer who is allowed to choose another legal remedy than the one attached to the strict liability (contractual liability for delusive conduct, for instance), the manufacturer, along with the professional vendor being forced to respect the strict liability rules, the imperative character of which indicates they are compulsory for the professional party.
Internet users in Bulgaria have become extremely conscious of delusive use of images on the Internet following the recent scandal with the New Year's Eve speech of Bulgarian President during which a photo of the US Rocky Mountains resort of Aspen, Colorado, was shown as a demonstration of the beauty of Bulgarian nature.
Leland once declared, "A man has an indefensible right to believe what is not true, and perform worship that is hypocritical or delusive.
Muscat: In a bid to ensure better consumer protection in the Sultanate, the Public Authority for Consumer Protection (PACP) will launch a new programme called 'The Delusive Consumer' soon to upgrade and enhance the performance level its staff.
Here, dispassionate deliberation flirts with darkening of the mind by delusive self-love (the cupiditas condemned by Augustinian Christianity, naturalized in privileging one's own of one's in-group's flourishing).
Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?
F]or the Constitution to declare a right inalienable, and at the same time leave the Legislature unlimited power over it, would be a contradiction in terms, an idle provision, proving that a Constitution was a mere parchment barrier, insufficient to protect the citizen, delusive and visionary, and the practical result of which would be to destroy, not conserve, the rights it vainly presumed to protect.
Critics who apostrophize David Copperfield's progress in life as delusive and interested do not seem to recognize that the context of the novel makes it imperative for David to reject an idea of discipline that would make him similar to an automaton.
There is a qualitative difference," he claims, "between a delusive, anti-Semitic approach that believes, or seeks to make others believe, that the leaders of the Jews or the 'Jewish race' are conspiring against the rest of the world, and an equally delusive but not racist approach that seeks consolation by mobilizing a conspiracy theory to explain Zionist successes.
Yet in the end, as with all of Suvorov's writings, the fascinating thing about Devil's Mama is the nearly unimaginable degree of secrecy, duplicity, and deception of which it shows a totalitarian regime capable in the pursuit of its policies, however delusive or self-destructive.
Azzam Ahmed, member of the central committee of Abbas' mainstream Fatah movement who accompanied the president to New York, told AL HAYAT "The Palestinian Authority is a delusive authority.