demand

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demand

1. Economics
a. willingness and ability to purchase goods and services
b. the amount of a commodity that consumers are willing and able to purchase at a specified price
2. Law a formal legal claim, esp to real property

demand

[də′mand]
(electricity)

demand

1. The electric load on a system, integrated over a specific time interval; usually expressed in watts or kilowatts.
2. The volume of gas per unit time (usually expressed in cubic feet per hour or liters per second) or the amount of heat (usually expressed in Btu per hour or megajoules per hour) required for the operation of one or more gas appliances.
3. The rate of flow of water, usually expressed in gallons per minute (liters per second), furnished by a water supply system to various types of plumbing fixtures and water outlets under normal conditions.
References in periodicals archive ?
This in-between category of demandable debt seems to apply well to the Chettiar case.
Specifically, the incentive to run stems from the combination of demandable liabilities and illiquid assets, as in Diamond and Philip Dybvig (1983), not simply from the cliff effect due to a fixed $1.
It provides that judicial power includes the duty of the courts of justice to settle actual controversies involving rights which are legally demandable and enforceable.
4) Gorton and Metrick (2010) argue that repos are therefore a type of money because they are liquid, functionally demandable at par due to their largely overnight tenor, and able to function as an overnight store of value.
La primera condicion demandable para eso es de que el papel de TI este claramente definido en la organizacion y definitivamente a servicio de la estrategia corporativa.
Yet failures in these industries cannot be blamed on contagion resulting from a reliance on demandable liabilities, implying that something else may also have been at work during the similar boom and bust in banking.
Although he allows that "most financial instruments have, of course, an intermediate-type nature," he does not allow that demandable debt--the common contractual form historically taken by demand deposits and banknotes--is a blend of the two types.
In particular, in a crisis, banks may need enough liquidity assistance to meet all of their demandable obligations, as stressed by Chang and Velasco (2000c).
The result is the most highly demandable product line in America.