demyelinating disease


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demyelinating disease

[dē′mī·ə·lə‚nād·iŋ di‚zēz]
(medicine)
Any disease associated with the destruction or removal of myelin from nerves.
References in periodicals archive ?
Increased risk for demyelinating diseases in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
Inappropriate treatment may lead to exacerbation of the condition; for example, the neurologic decline of patients with demyelinating disease after having undergone irradiation.
The clinical diagnosis of inflammatory demyelinating disease in a patient without a history of CNS symptoms and with neuroradiologic evidence of a focal mass process requires brain biopsy.
ADEM is a monophasic, nonvasculitic, inflammatory, demyelinating disease that can affect the entire central nervous system (CNS).
Furthermore, the first-ever transplants of human NSCs into human patients for Batten Disease, a demyelinating disease that affects children, were at Dr.
They describe ocular anatomy and eye examination, then core conditions in ophthalmology, including the ophthalmic features of systemic hypertension, diabetes, sarcoidosis, endocarditis, and demyelinating disease and space-occupying lesions of the brain, as well as how to recognize iritis, different forms of retinopathy, and the difference between papilloedema and papillitis.
TNF-antagonists, including HUMIRA, have been associated in rare cases with demyelinating disease including multiple sclerosis.
The adverse event profile for infliximab was similar to what was reported in 2005 for the ACT 1 and 2 studies, with no additional cases of tuberculosis, demyelinating disease, or hematologic events, Dr.
7-11, 16-18) Although we cannot exclude the possibility of a primary process involving the peripheral vestibular neuroepithelial cells, our findings--particularly our finding of demyelination with axon sparing--are highly suggestive of an active primary demyelinating disease process that might be of immune-mediated origin.
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS), which is characterized by multifocal plaque-like lesions that attack the myelin sheath, the protective covering for the nerve cells.
Would it be possible to use fetal transplants to reverse demyelinating disease in humans?