denouement


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denouement

, d?nouement
Theatre
a. the final clarification or resolution of a plot in a play or other work
b. the point at which this occurs
References in periodicals archive ?
The various plot strands simmer pleasantly, guaranteeing a gooey, heart-warming denouement.
There were reports in some markets that cable companies were flooded with calls wondering why their service cut out just as the series finale was reaching its denouement.
And they definitely disappointed guests, including Minnie Driver and Ricardo Chavira, who expected them to magically appear at the party in the denouement of their vanishing act.
The diverse themes of affection, despair, trust, betrayal, gambling, death, and the ultimate gifts from an undying love, all play a part in an intrigue-laden denouement.
1) To the mystery of Confederate incapacity at Missionary Ridge, Armstead Robinson offers a compelling explanation, which, in effect, forms the denouement to his engrossing analysis of why the Confederacy lost the War between the States.
But writer-director Stovall at least tosses in enough potential suspects to keep the denouement something of a surprise.
The duet reaches a denouement when she stops in an obliquely angled arabesque, face-down in resignation and resolution.
After a plodding opening half hour, which tests our patience, Stephen Massicotte's screenplay gradually loses its feeble grasp on coherence as the heroine descends into the underworld, heading for a muddled denouement.
This book has its heart in the right place and like many books of its genre will fly off the shelf, denouement or not.
The editing climaxes in a rapid-fire sequence of closeups of eyes, followed by a lulling denouement depicting the end of the day and the return to sleep, the cycle announced by a hushed voice-over: "Then it starts again.
Richard John Neuhaus wrote, "With the election of Pope Benedict XVI, the curtain has fallen on the long-running drama of the myth of "the spirit of Vatican II," in which the revolution mandated by the Council was delayed by the timidity of Paul VI and temporarily derailed for twenty-plus years by the regressive John Paul II, as the Church inexorably moved toward the happy denouement of "the next pope" who would resume the course of progressive accommodation to the wisdom of the modern world" ("Rome Diary," First Things online).
Everyone knows that public morals have gone down the sewer (there's been an epidemic of drug addiction and prostitution, among other things); and, in an Animal Farm denouement, the instigators of the Revolution have become as greedy and shameless as the men they overthrew.