Den

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den

1. the habitat or retreat of a lion or similar wild animal; lair
2. Scot a small wooded valley; dingle
3. Scot and northern English dialect a place of sanctuary in certain catching games; home or base

Den’

 

(Day), a bourgeois, left-liberal daily newspaper published in Petrograd from 1912 to 1918. Among its contributors were bourgeois radicals (A. V. Amfiteatrov and N. P. Asheshov), Narodniks (Populists) and Socialist Revolutionaries (V. Bogucharskii, R. V. Ivanov-Razumnik, and S. D. Mstislavskii), and Menshevik-liquidators (D. I. Zaslavskii, St. Ivanovich, N. I. Iordanskii, and P. S. Iushkevich). The newspaper criticized tsarism and the bourgeois-pome shchik (landlord) parties from the liberal Menshevik position. During World War I it occupied a defensist position. After May 30 (June 12), 1917, Den’ became an organ of the Mensheviks. It supported the bourgeois Provisional Government and opposed the Bolsheviks. The newspaper reacted with hostility to the October Socialist Revolution. It was closed on Oct. 26 (Nov. 8), 1917, by the Petrograd Military Revolutionary Committee but for some time continued to publish under different names. It was finally closed in May 1918 for anti-Soviet propaganda.


Den

 

the place where some mammals rest for a long time, hibernate, or raise their cubs. A den, unlike a burrow, is on the surface and usually in a secluded spot: in thick underbrush, among reeds, in a gully, beneath a cliff, or in a cave. Jackals, foxes, wolves, hyenas, tigers, lions, and wild boars build dens. A bear’s den is called berloga in Russian; a den occupied briefly is called lezhka. The latter is built by hares, rodents, and most ungulates.

den

An indoor retreat, usually small, for work or leisure. also see chamber, 1.

DEN

(Directory Enabled Networks) The management of a network from a central depository of information about users, applications and network resources. Originally an initiative from Microsoft and Cisco, DEN was turned over to the DMTF in 1998, and its extensions were made part of the CIM specification in 1999. See WBEM, CIM and DMTF.
References in classic literature ?
Well, old boy, you haven't got any sweeter in the den this half.
The vulguses being finished by nine o'clock, and Martin having rejoiced above measure in the abundance of light, and of Gradus and dictionary, and other conveniences almost unknown to him for getting through the work, and having been pressed by Arthur to come and do his verses there whenever he liked, the three boys went down to Martin's den, and Arthur was initiated into the lore of birds' eggs, to his great delight.
I cannot stay longer, sweet friends," quoth Little John, as he pushed in betwixt the two cobs, "therefore I wish you good den.
I give you good den, brothers, and may ye have a pleasant journey henceforth.
I mean that they remain in the upper world: but this must not be allowed; they must be made to descend again among the prisoners in the den, and partake of their labours and honours, whether they are worth having or not.
When you have acquired the habit, you will see ten thousand times better than the inhabitants of the den, and you will know what the several images are, and what they represent, because you have seen the beautiful and just and good in their truth.
Had I been recognised in that den my life would not have been worth an hour's purchase; for I have used it before now for my own purposes, and the rascally Lascar who runs it has sworn to have vengeance upon me.
We should be rich men if we had 1000 pounds for every poor devil who has been done to death in that den.
Convinced that something was amiss with him, she rushed down the steps--for the house was none other than the opium den in which you found me to-night--and running through the front room she attempted to ascend the stairs which led to the first floor.
Now for the sinister cripple who lives upon the second floor of the opium den, and who was certainly the last human being whose eyes rested upon Neville St.
Clair was doing in the opium den, what happened to him when there, where is he now, and what Hugh Boone had to do with his disappearance--are all as far from a solution as ever.
He was the keeper of a low den in which I used to lodge in Swandam Lane, where I could every morning emerge as a squalid beggar and in the evenings transform myself into a well-dressed man about town.