dense

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dense

1. Physics having a high density
2. (of a photographic negative) having many dark or exposed areas
3. (of an optical glass, colour, etc.) transmitting little or no light

dense

[dens]
(graphic arts)
Very opaque because of a concentration of material, as pertaining to a negative or transparency that has been overdeveloped or overexposed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Denseness of canopy is estimated related closely to the presence of elephants reflected from the abundance of elephant feces where tighter canopy cover, the more abundant numbers of elephant feces are in certain habitat.
This hopelessness is one of the central precepts of the Theatre of the Absurd, and in The Myth of Sisyphus, where Albert Camus argues that the world is essentially absurd, impenetrable, and devoid of absolute meaning: "that denseness and that strangeness of the world is the absurd" (Camus 20).
But it might be the denseness of some modern poets that contributes to the way poetry fails to flourish outside a tight and tiny circle of disciples.
Those who dismiss his centeredness as self-centeredness or his composure as indifference are as wrong as those who mistook Eisenhower's stolidity for denseness or Lincoln's humor for lack of seriousness.
it says nothing about the denseness of the activity within the block of time that contact occurs.
Greetings to the one who shares my glass with me In the denseness of a night outflanking the two spaces: Greetings to my apparition.
The difference is provided by the high affinity of the adhesive at cotton fibre and the better denseness of made bond points, (the cotton fabric has a more compact and thinner structure);
Its large, leathery leaves give the copy denseness although, in truth, it has relatively few branches.
Aled attributed the denseness of swards to the use of a slow-release fertiliser, which evens out the early flush of growth.
This very denseness implies lack of light, duly emphasized by Tolkien: images of shadows, darkness, and night recur in the text of this chapter, while the waters of the Withywindle are correspondingly brown (154).
The man and the anxious woman," he writes, "went forward into its denseness.