density rule

density rule

[′den·səd·ē ‚rül]
(engineering)
A grading system for lumber based on the width of annual rings.
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Department of Transportation (DOT) an application for an exemption from the high density rule for slots at New York's LaGuardia Airport.
Although growth at O'Hare airport is currently restricted by limited slot access under the high density rule in effect at the airport, there are legislative efforts under way to provide some relief to these restrictions.
The routing system automatically slots metal or cuts out metal to avoid maximum density rule violations and fills sparse areas with metal to obey minimum density rules.
DOT is currently conducting a study of the high density rule and will make a report to Congress early next year.
A third application, also under review at the DOT, is for an exemption from the High Density Rule.
Kennedy International Airport, the airline filed a request with the United States Department of Transportation on February 5 for an exemption to the High Density Rule for service to JFK.
The high density rule, which was first imposed in 1969, limits the number of slots available at the airports -- New York's LaGuardia and John F.
Last month, JetBlue received an exemption to the High Density Rule at JFK for 75 take-off and landing slots.
The "high density rule," commonly known as the "slot rule," is a 25-year-old regulation that limits hourly scheduled takeoffs and landings at four of the nation's most congested airports -- New York's LaGuardia and Kennedy, Chicago O'Hare and Washington National.
The Midwest Aviation Coalition (MAC) said the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) approval of six new carriers serving O'Hare International Airport is the first example of the breadth of benefits expected from the removal of the High Density Rule.
A House-Senate report has been released that is proposing to remove the high density rule at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport.
The developers have filed for a general plan amendment, which might lead to the eventual changing of the city's density rules.