plaque

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Related to dental plaque: dental calculus

plaque

1. Pathol any small abnormal patch on or within the body, such as the typical lesion of psoriasis
2. short for dental plaque

Plaque

A tablet, often inscribed, added to or set into a surface on the exterior or interior wall.

plaque

[plak]
(medicine)
A patch, or an abnormal flat area on any internal or external body surface.
A localized area of atherosclerosis.
(virology)
A clear area representing a colony of viruses on a plate culture formed by lysis of the host cell.

plaque

A tablet that is affixed to the surface of a wall or set into a wall; often inscribed to commemorate a special event or to serve as a memorial.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mouth hygiene was assessed for dental plaque index, tartar, gum disease and tooth loss.
Score 1: The tooth surface appears clean, but dental plaque can be removed from the gingival third with a sharp explorer.
Almost all knew that most important in the prevention of dental caries are the regular removal of dental plaque by brushing teeth (95.
Mouthwashes can be classified into therapeutic and cosmetic ones, with the former playing a significant role in treating a host of oral problems such as tooth decay, dental plaque, tooth sensitivity, and gingivitis or gum disease.
Dental plaque is present at all 198 patients with maladapted periodontal fixed prosthetic restorations and strengthens the action with the iatrogenic prosthetic factors (maladapted cervical edge, occlusal, proximal, the incorrect relation of the bridge-body to the crest, irritation given by the material used in the restoration of the prostheses).
Dental plaque is a primary ecological niche for Haemophilus aphrophilus.
Gum disease is caused by bacteria sticking to your dog's teeth forming a sticky layer called dental plaque.
Gum disease is caused by bacteria sticking to a dog's teeth, forming a sticky layer called dental plaque.
Gum disease is caused by bacteria sticking to your dog's teeth, forming a sticky layer called dental plaque.
The human gingival epithelial cells (HGECs) lining the gingival sulcus respond to perturbation by microbes of dental plaque by releasing a wide range of cytokines.
2002; Shinn, 2004) have verified that removing bacteria from the oropharynx requires the removal of dental plaque, and the only way to remove the plaque is with toothbrushing.
When you don't take good care of your mouth, bacteria can cling to your teeth and form a sticky, colorless film called dental plaque.