denture

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Related to denture retention: complete denture

denture,

artificial replacement for natural teeth and surrounding tissue. Dentures are classified as partial or complete. The former are removable and maintained by clasps, or are fixed bridges with crowns cemented over adjacent teeth or over spikes embedded in the jaw. Complete dentures are replacements for all of the teeth of a jaw and are normally held in place by the suction created by saliva and by the close matching of the denture base to the tissues of the mouth. The first-known mention of dentures is found in the 1728 manuscript of Pierre Fouchard, a French dental surgeon often called the father of modern dentistry. Various substances including wood, ivory, and metal have been used in the construction of dentures, but major advances have resulted from the development of synthetic rubbers and plastics. Today dentures are usually composed of acryllic or porcelain teeth mounted in an acryllic base that is tinted to resemble the gums.

denture

[′den·chər]
(medicine)
A partial or complete prosthetic appliance to replace one or more missing teeth.

denture

1. a partial or full set of artificial teeth
2. Rare a set of natural teeth
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, comparison among both groups for satisfaction related to maxillary and mandibular denture retention respectively, group A patients were slightly better satisfied than group B owing to the fact that occlusal harmony increases stability of dentures yet showed insignificant difference statistically.
While the adhesive systems available in the market are very effective for solving complete denture retention problems and to improve their stability providing patient comfort, some of their presentations include chemical compositions with zinc salt content, which have been reported by several studies to be harmful at high levels.
The implantation of magnets in the jaw to aid denture retention.
Chi square test showed no statistically significant difference between the two denture adhesive pastes on lower denture retention (p= 0.
The neutral zone concept and monoplane occlusion can be applied in the construction of complete dentures, to improve both denture retention and stability during speech and mastication, especially in those patients with significant loss of alveolar bone.
A contemporary review of the factors involved in complete denture retention, stability and support Part I: retention.
The objective of the study was to compare the mean increase in denture retention strength with paste and powder form of the denture adhesives, on mandibular complete denture.